‘Django Unchained’ Actress Daniele Watts Handcuffed by Police After Kissing White Husband

The ‘Django Unchained’ actress was detained by police after she was spotted kissing her white husband in a car. Apparently, Watts was mistaken for a prostitute, although she was fully clothed.

The moment, when Daniele Watts, an African-American actress, who played Coco in "Django Unchained" was arrested by police officers who mistook her for a prostitute when she kissed her white husband in public. Photo: Austin Ogiza/Flickr

The moment, when Daniele Watts, an African-American actress, who played Coco in “Django Unchained” was arrested by police officers who mistook her for a prostitute when she kissed her white husband in public. Photo: Austin Ogiza/Flickr

The actress Daniele Watts, who had her moment of fame in an Oscar-winning film “Django Unchained”, claims she was unlawfully arrested by a police officer on Thursday after being mistaken for a prostitute as she kissed her white husband.

The “Django Unchained” star claims she and husband Brian James Lucas were kissing on a Hollywood street when police were called and they were asked to show their ID cards. When Watts refused, she was handcuffed and placed in the back of their police car.

“Today I was handcuffed and detained by 2 police officers from the Studio City Police Department after refusing to agree that I had done something wrong by showing affection, fully clothed, in a public place,” the actress actor wrote on the Facebook account.

Watts, who also appeared on the new show “Partners” as Martin Lawrence’s daughter, continued: “When the officer arrived, I was standing on the sidewalk by a tree. I was talking to my father on my cell phone.

“I knew that I had done nothing wrong, that I wasn’t harming anyone, so I walked away. A few minutes later, I was still talking to my dad when 2 different police officers accosted me and forced me into handcuffs.

“As I was sitting in the back of the police car, I remembered the countless times my father came home frustrated or humiliated by the cops when he had done nothing wrong. I allowed myself to be honest about my anger, frustration, and rage as tears flowed from my eyes.”

Separately her chef husband, Brian James Lucas, posted on his Facebook page that he thought that the person who called the police had decided they looked like a prostitute and a client.

He wrote: ‘From the questions that he asked me as D was already on her phone with her dad, I could tell that whoever called on us (including the officers), saw a tatted RAWKer white boy and a hot bootie shorted black girl and thought we were a H* (prostitute) & a TRICK (client).

“What an assumption to make!!!Because of my past experience with the law, I gave him my ID knowing we did nothing wrong and when they asked D for hers, she refused to give it because they had no right to do so.

“So they handcuffed her and threw her roughly into the back of the cop car until they could figure out who she was. In the process of handcuffing her, they cut her wrist, which was truly NOT COOL!!!”

Watts was released from police custody shortly after being put in the back of the police car. It appears, however, that she did not leave unscathed. A photo on Lucas’ Facebook shows cuts on Watts’ skin allegedly left from the handcuffs.

However, a spokesman for the Los Angeles Police Department told Variety magazine there was no record of the incident as Watts was not brought into the station for questioning.

The incident comes weeks after California police officers detained an African American television producer who was travelling to a pre-Emmy Awards party. Charles Belk said he was unfairly treated because he “fitted a description”.

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