Apple Inc. Admits iPhone 5 Battery Flaw and Issues Recall

Apple confirms that it has sold iPhone 5 with defective batteries and recalls the devices back.

The Cupertino based company has admitted that some iPhone 5 smartphones went on sale with defective batteries which ran out too quickly and has already launched a free replacement scheme. Photo:Quin@/Flickr

The Cupertino based company has admitted that some iPhone 5 smartphones went on sale with defective batteries which ran out too quickly and has already launched a free replacement scheme. Photo:Quin@/Flickr

Apple admitted in a statement that a “very small percentage” of iPhone 5 handsets went on sale with battery problems. The affected smartphones “may suddenly experience shorter battery life or need to be charged more frequently”, it said.

“Apple has determined that a very small percentage of iPhone 5 devices may suddenly experience shorter battery life or need to be charged more frequently. The affected iPhone 5 devices were sold between September 2012 and January 2013 and fall within a limited serial number range,” the tech giant said.

“If your iPhone 5 is experiencing these symptoms and meets the eligibility requirements noted below, Apple will replace your iPhone 5 battery, free of charge,” the company promised.

The iPhone 5 owners who purchased their handsets in US and China can have their batteries replaced right at the moment, while the programme will commence in Europe on August 29.

People who will bring their defective iPhone 5 to an Apple shop to have their battery replaced are advised by the company to backup their data to iTunes or iCloud first, turn off the Find my iPhone feature and erase all data.

“Those handsets with cracked screens may need to be repaired before the battery can be replaced,” the Telegraph writes, “and the owner will be charged for that service.”

By the way, it is not the first time the company was forced to recall over faulty batteries. In October last year Apple said that a “very limited number” of iPhone 5S handsets had a “manufacturing issue… that could cause the battery to take longer to charge or result in reduced battery life”.

The New York Times estimated that “a few thousand phones” were affected.

Meanwhile, Apple is getting prepared to release its highly expected iPhone 6.

Recent rumors claim that the new iPhone will be named ‘iPhone 6L,’ where L stands for ‘Large.’

According to the Hong Kong-based Apple Daily, the tech giant will apparently name its rumored big- screen new iPhone as ‘iPhone 6L.’ It is though unclear where the site discovered the name, but it arouses a question about the possible name of the Apple’s smaller iPhone.

Mashable believes that the most suitable name will be just ‘iPhone 6’, as such names like ‘iPhone 6C’ and ‘iPhone 6S’ won’t truly disclose the real nature of the future device. The “cheap” version won’t make sense since the iPhone 6 will be a brand-new design.

The ‘6S’ name doesn’t work either, since the ‘S’ has always been reserved for the second generation of a particular iPhone design, and this year’s revamp will feature all-new models. There is no concrete evidence that the 5.5-inch model will be called iPhone 6L, but it makes sense because Apple may use a different name for at least one of the iPhones.

In addition to leaking a new name, Apple Daily also claimed the battery sizes in both iPhones. The 5.5-inch iPhone model will reportedly sport a larger 2915mAh battery, while the 4.7-inch iPhone will pack 1810mAh battery, which is a major overhaul compared to iPhone 5S’ 1560mAh battery.

Previous leaks have noted various details such as use of unbreakable sapphire-crystal screens for the new iPhones, faster processors and latest iOS 8.

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