Samsung Unveils 8.4-inch and 10.5-inch Galaxy Tab S Tablets

Samsung revealed its Galaxy Tab S – in two sizes of 10.5-inch and 8.4-inch – to rival Apple’s iPad.

At the Galaxy Premier 2014 held in New York Samsung Electronics introduced the Galaxy Tab S, Samsung’s thinnest and lightest tablet to date. This Super AMOLED tablet combines the most advanced display technology with a full range of premium content for an unrivaled entertainment experience. Photo: SamsungTomorrow/Flickr

At the Galaxy Premier 2014 held in New York Samsung Electronics introduced the Galaxy Tab S, Samsung’s thinnest and lightest tablet to date. This Super AMOLED tablet combines the most advanced display technology with a full range of premium content for an unrivaled entertainment experience. Photo: SamsungTomorrow/Flickr

During its event in New York at the Madison Square Garden theater, the Korean electronics giant announced new addition to its tablet family. The company introduced the high-end Galaxy Tab S, calling it its new flagship tablet.

“The tablet is becoming a popular personal viewing device for enjoying content, which makes the quality of the display a critical feature,” said JK Shin, CEO and President of IT & Mobile Division, Samsung Electronics.

“With the launch of the Galaxy Tab S, Samsung is setting the industry bar higher for the entire mobile industry. It will provide consumers with a visual and entertainment experience that brings colors to life, beautifully packaged in a sleek and ultra-portable mobile device.”

The Galaxy Tab S, which comes in two sizes, 10.5-inch and 8.4-inch, and two colors – titanium bronze or dazzling white – features color-enhancing technology which it claims remains clear and bright even in sunlight and ensures the “best visual experience anywhere, anytime.”

The Galaxy Tab S lands with a high-res Super AMOLED display with 2,560 x 1,600 resolution in comparison to iPad Air with 2,048×1,536 resolution and 264ppi density.

“It portrays the true colors that content creators intended,” said Michael Abary, a senior vice president at Samsung Electronics America.

Plus, the new Samsung flagship is slimmer than the paper thin Apple iPad (7.5 mm), as it measures just 6.6 mm.The weight is 465g (16.4 ounces) for the large size and 294g (10.4 ounces) for the smaller design.

It also comes with an 8-megapixel rear-facing camera with a 2.1-megapixel “selfie” rear-facing camera, and lands with 802.11n/ac wireless networking — which throws out some of the best speeds in modern consumer and enterprise networking.

Both Galaxy Tablet S variants run Android’s 4.4 KitKat operating system powered by Exynos 5 Octa (1.9 GHz Quad-core + 1.3 GHz Quad-core) or Qualcomm Snapdragon 800 2.3 GHz Quad-core CPU (type of processor depends on the region/operator), 3GB RAM and 16GB/32GB inbuilt memory.

The Galaxy Tab S borrows an important feature from the Galaxy S5 smartphone: a fingerprint scanner. Up to eight people can use fingerprints to log into different profiles on the device.

The Tab S includes SideSync, which lets the tablet pair with a Galaxy S 5. Once paired, the tablet can mirror the tablet’s screen in a smaller virtual window, letting users take calls on the tablet via its speakers and microphone. SideSync can also be used to transfer files or even run apps, says Mashable.

Samsung also made deals with major media companies to include free subscriptions to digital versions of The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, Sirius XM Radio and other services for periods of three months to a year.

In the U.S., the Samsung Galaxy Tab S will cost $499 for the 10.5-inch version, and $399 for the 8.4-inch.

Duncan Bell, operations editor at UK-based gadget magazine T3, said it should be able to compete with the iPad.

He said: “After several years of releasing a market-confusing glut of middling-to-good tablets, the S seems to be an attempt by Samsung to say ‘this time we’ve got it right.’

“The specs leaked so far suggest a device easily able to go toe to toe with the iPad. However, Apple’s device is so dominant that the S will also need to be cheaper if it’s to truly compete.”

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