What Happens When Lava Engulfs a Can of Coca Cola [Video]

Photographer Brian Lowry shot two cans slowly absorbed by 2,000-degree lava. See what happened.

Have you ever wondered what is going to happen with a can of Coca Cola placed in volcanic lava? If yes, photographer Brian Lowry, who wondered the same thing, can fully satisfy your curiosity.

Lowry has spent years shooting Hawaii’s lava flows, and last year he posted anΒ intriguing videoΒ of lava immersing a can of Chef Boyardee ravioli. However, this time he decided to test Cola to see if the cans are going to explode. He conducted two separate experiments, and made a video that he has posted on YouTube.

“This series of videos is scientific in nature,” Lowry writes, adding that he hopes his work can illuminate “how differing sealed objects react to the 2,000-degree lava.”

In the clip you can see the two cans placed in the path of an advancing 2000 degree F lava flow in Hawaii. In the first can he punched a tiny hole “to prevent it from randomly exploding.”

Lowrty said: “I wanted to see if it would fountain as it heated up but, the can just sort of squirted coke,” adding “the second can was sealed but, fell over. The lava caused a leak on the lower side.”

Both clips were caught on expensive camera equipment, and since 2,000-degree lava is extremely dangerous, Lowry warns amateurs not to replicate his experiments. “Don’t try this at home,” he writes, advice that most likely applies away from home as well.

“Safety precautions were taken and only the GoPro was slightly in harm’s way. By the end of this outing most of my camera gear was just a bit sticky.”

He obviously couldn’t recycle the aluminum cans afterward, but as he points out on YouTube, volcanoes are sort of like Mother Nature’s garbage incinerators. “If anyone’s worried this is littering, relax,” Lowry writes. “These items all melted.”

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