Only 248 Americans Signed up for Obamacare in First Two Days

Just 248 Americans singed up for Obamacare, according to documents released on Thursday by a U.S. House of Representatives committee.

Enrollment in Obamacare are incredibly small in first days, a U.S. House of Representatives committee. Photo: Tabitha Kaylee Hawk/Flickr

The president’s administration has refused to unveil the enrollment figures from HealthCare.gov explainung that it doesn’t have the numbers.

The federal website, which allows residents from 36 states to buy new healthcare plans under President Barack Obama’s law, was launched on October 1.

“We do not have any reliable data around enrollment, which is why we haven’t given it to date,” Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius told lawmakers on Wednesday.

However, the documents labeled “war room” appeared to be summaries of issues with the problematic website beginning on October 2.

The documents show that a mere six enrollments had occurred by that morning – the day after the website was launched and almost immediately crashed, Reuters reports.

“High capacity on the website, direct enrollment not working,” the October 2 notes said. By later that day, “approximately 100” enrollments had taken place. “As of yesterday, there were 248 enrollments,” said the notes from the morning of October 3.

Health and Human Services spokeswoman Joanne Peters told reporters that the department will release enrollment statistics on Obamacare on a monthly basis after processing all the data from different sources.

The list of sources includes call centers, paper applications for insurance, and data from insurers and states. The first release of enrollment data is scheduled on mid-November, Peters explained.

“These appear to be notes, they do not include official enrollment statistics,” Peters said of the documents Issa’s panel released.

“As the secretary (Sebelius) said before Congress, we are focused on providing reliable and accurate information and we do not have that at this time … We have always anticipated that the pace of enrollment will increase throughout the enrollment period.”

The president’s administration announced that it has brought in experts from top tech companies including Internet searching giant Google Inc and Oracle Corp to fix the HealthCare.gov website.

Health and Human Services also confirmed that it had invited best technology experts and engineers to its round-the-clock effort to fix the glitches on the federal site.

Giving some of the first details of who is responsible for site repair, HHS officials named two experts: Michael Dickerson, a website reliability engineer on leave from Google, and Greg Gershman, a Baltimore-based innovation director with the firm Mobomo and who previously worked for the White House and the General Services Administration.

“We are doing everything we can to assist those contractors to make HealthCare.gov a highly performant, highly reliable, highly secure system,” Oracle CEO Larry Ellison told shareholders at the company’s annual meeting on Thursday in Redwood City, California. There was no comment from Google.

High-qualified experts from Oracle and Red Hat have already expertised the site’s reliability, stability and scalability, claims in a blog post  Julie Bataille, spokeswoman for CMS.

She goes on, revealing that Dickerson, the expert on leave from Google Inc, would be working for Quality Software Services Inc (QSSI), while Gershman would be working for CGI Federal, “so they are employees of those particular companies” during the work involved.

Administration and company officials gave no further details on how much help was being provided.

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