Staying Safe with Apps on Your Tablet

One of the most popular methods for distributing tablet-based viruses and malware programs is through apps. This doesn’t mean that you can’t use apps, but it does mean you need to be careful. Here are some things you need to consider before you download your next one.

Sometimes the risk from apps has nothing to do with malware or identity theft. In some cases, it’s just for the sanity of your tablet. Your tablet has a finite amount of memory. Overloading that memory with apps can cause it to run slower, and that can make the experience more frustrating. Photo: eBook Reader/Flickr

When purchasing your new tablet, one of the most exciting things is downloading all of the new applications. You can find an application for just about everything, but unfortunately, hackers and virus developers know it.

One of the most popular methods for distributing tablet-based viruses and malware programs is through apps. This doesn’t mean that you can’t use apps, but it does mean you need to be careful. Here are some things you need to consider before you download your next one.

Feedback and Reviews

Watch out for new apps that don’t have a lot of feedback or reviews. According to “New Cyber Crimes,” virus developers and tablet hackers tend to create new apps, and leave them to collect the information, or release the virus.

They don’t spend a lot of time developing a presence. This means that an app that has a lot of feedback and positive reviews is probably legitimate. New apps are not necessarily bad, but they are more likely to contain viruses.

Generally Do Not Give Out Financial Information

Be very suspicious about giving out any financial information or identity-based information on any app. While some apps, such as banking apps or financial assistance apps, do require this information, you need to verify that they are legitimate.

Never give out this information on an unverified app. Identity thieves do tend to be more thorough in their app development. Unfortunately, you can’t just get tablet accessories that will evaluate the accuracy of an app’s claims.

But what you can do is contact the publisher of the app to make sure it is what it says it is. When you download an app that requires confidential or sensitive information, make sure it is from someone you trust. Never assume that just because it looks professional, or it sounds good, that it is legitimate. If the app has been developed by an identity thief, the information will be funneled straight to the thief as soon as you enter it.

Only Download What You Need

Sometimes the risk from apps has nothing to do with malware or identity theft. In some cases, it’s just for the sanity of your tablet. Your tablet has a finite amount of memory. Overloading that memory with apps can cause it to run slower, and that can make the experience more frustrating.

As a general rule, take the time every three months to go through your apps. If you have not use one in three months, then delete it. You can always download it again if you want. By removing the apps that you do not use, you free up space in your tablet, and make it easier for the device to perform at maximum efficiency.

One of the great things about tablets is the vast number of market apps you can choose from. But you need to be cautious about the apps you download. Check the feedback and reviews to make sure that the app is good.

Avoid giving out financial confidential information without verifying where it’s going. And regularly comb through your apps to make sure that you only downloaded what you need. Following these tips will help keep your tablet functioning better and longer.

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