Facebook Employees Reveal ‘the Truth’ About Working for the Social Network

Former Facebook crew members shared their working experience in the company, and it tuned out ot be a disaster.

Complaints from average Facebook employees vary from the lack of office professionalism to complaints of Mark Zuckerberg’s “holier than thou” attitude. Photo: dangaken/Flickr

Facebook has often been regarded as one of the best places to work in the tech industry. Even last year it was voted world’s best employer but it seems that not all employees agree with this accolade.

Various engineers, software developers, and anonymous sources from Facebook’s front lines divulge the details about the worst things about working for the social network. Of course, a spokesperson for Facebook said that the company would not comment on the story.

However, what is so bad about working in the tech giant?

Well, according to the words of former employees it seems, that there are lot of things to be happy about.

Probably, not everyone would enjoy working longer than 8 hours a day.  Like Keith Adams, an engineer at Facebook, who was expected to work 24 hours a day, seven days a week for six weeks of the year: “During on-call duty, engineers are responsible for keeping the service up and running, come what may. For those weeks I don’t leave town on the weekend.”

Referring to Facebook founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg and COO Sheryl Sandberg, a source complains that the two spend way too much time on “extracurricular activities” and allegedly copying off the competition

Another Facebook engineer who chose to remain anonymous on Quora was disappointed with a lack of any privacy in the company. Because of the company’s culture to encourage its people to “be themselves” the company lacks “professionalism.”

“At most companies, you put up a wall between a work personality and a personal one, which ends up with a professional workspace.

“This wall does not exist at Facebook which can lead to some uncomfortable situations.”

Employees say that trying to figure out how to do cool things with a team of 4,000 people is much harder than doing them with a team of 500, thus the company doesn’t have a right infrastructure to function properly.

“We’re growing so fast and have never emphasised organisation, polish, or stability,” said one of the employees.

Anonymous employee said that this lack of focus had a big impact on workers: “Instructions were not clear, everything was a guessing game, and I was immediately set up to fail. And when I didn’t perform, I was told I lacked intuition as a professional.

A former member of the Facebook crew said that this lack of focus had a big impact on workers: “Instructions were not clear, everything was a guessing game, and I was immediately set up to fail. And when I didn’t perform, I was told I lacked intuition as a professional.

The spouse of a former Facebook employee said that her husband was the recipient of many complaints about the site from friends and family, just because he was employed by the company.

“As a Facebook spouse, I was often asked for help on how to use the privacy settings solely on the basis that, being married to someone who works at Facebook, I must know.”

Some even complain and call their work at Facebook the worst working experience ever.

“It was probably my worst professional experience to date. I was temporarily assigned [as an admin] with very little guidance or support, serving two of the worst leaders I’ve ever interacted with.

One anonymous former employee of Facebook confessed, “The team treated me like garbage and I was asked to [do] really inappropriate tasks (i.e. separating the director’s laundry complete with his wife’s dirty undies still attached).”

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