The Twinkie Returns with ‘The Sweetest Comeback in the History of Ever’

The extra-famous snack food brand is bringing its products back to stores.

Seven months after Hostess announced plans to shut down following its bankruptcy, Twinkie is back on the market again, promising the ‘sweetest comeback ever’. Photo: Shawn Burke/Flickr

According to reports, about 50 million Twinkies are expected to hit shops next week with the 83-year-old snack food brand’s new owner letting customers know a classic is back.

However, behind the pompous comeback of the popular cakes is a leaner operation, free of the union contracts and the $1.3 billion in debt that saddled the brand’s previous owners, writes The Wall Street Journal.

The brand’s new owner and chief executive, C. Dean Metropoulos, unveiled his plans to launch a great growth plan and avoid the problems that led to two Chapter 11 bankruptcies, that later resulted in the firm’s liquidation.

In his first interview about the company’s strategy, the new owner told the media that the new Hostess Brands LLC, based in Kansas City, Mo., will be focused, first of all, on innovation, efficiency and getting more Twinkies everywhere if it’s possible.

“Wherever you find a Snickers bar or M&Ms, you should be able to find a Twinkie,” he said.

Some workers who decided to stay and work for the company despite all the obstacles are being paid significantly less than they were before the bankruptcy ruined the brand.

The old Hostess gave work for about 19,000 people, many of whom were also employees on brands such as Wonder Bread that Mr. Metropoulos’s group didn’t purchase.

The renewed company is planning to hire about 1,800 people when it is fully staffed in the next couple of months.

The International Brotherhood of Teamsters refused to comment on the issue. The Bakery, Confectionery, Tobacco and Grain Millers International Union didn’t respond to requests for comment.

The Irving, Texas-based company revealed that it decided to liquidate the company after determining that not enough employees had returned to work by a deadline.

The company, which filed for bankruptcy in January, said it had filed a motion with U.S. Bankruptcy Judge Robert Drain in White Plains, New York, for permission to go out of business, The Telegraph reported at the time.

“We deeply regret the necessity of today’s decision, but we do not have the financial resources to weather an extended nationwide strike,” Chief Executive Gregory Rayburn said in a statement.

“Hostess Brands will move promptly to lay off most of its 18,500-member workforce and focus on selling its assets to the highest bidders,” Rayburn added.

Union President Frank Hurt said on Thursday that the crisis at the company was the “result of nearly a decade of financial and operational mismanagement.”

Last year Metropoulos purchased Pabst, North America’s largest privately-held brewer, for $250 million.

The 67-year-old has been involved in 78 consumer acquisitions in the last 25 years, including the largest one, Pabst Brewing Co., back in 2011. A spokeswoman said his deals’ average return on investment exceeds 44%.

If reports are true to believe, the owners purchased four of those plants and intend to spend up to $100 million to upgrade them. They plan to spend another $75 million to $80 million to open a fifth plant next year.

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