Brazilian Woman Catarina Migliorini, who Auctioned Virginity, Says She’s ‘a Victim’

The Brazilian woman who auctioned off her virginity for $780,000 says she was victimized but retained her virginity.

Migliorini’s virginity received bids from 15 people, with Lucas Zaiden placing the starting bid of $1 on 7 October on the website Virgins Wanted. The auction was organised by Jason Sisely, an Australian filmmaker, who started work on the Virgins Wanted project in 2009. Photo: Foto_Informe/Flickr

The Brazilian student, who sold her virginity for a staggering $780,000 after she put it up for auction online, is now claiming she is a victim who was exploited into selling her body.

However, now the 21-year old woman  from Brazil, told The Huffington Post by email that the highly publicized Internet auction last October, organized by filmmaker Justin Sisely, has turned into a giant fiasco.

“I felt I was a victim … I was misled by Mr. Justin Sisely,” Migliorini said. “I believe he is trying to defraud me and others.”

Migliorini’s virginity received bids from 15 people, with Lucas Zaiden placing the starting bid of $1 on 7 October on the website Virgins Wanted. The auction was organised by Jason Sisely,an Australian filmmaker, who started work on the Virgins Wanted project in 2009.

A 53-year-old Japanese millionaire who identified himself online as “Natsu” placed the winning bid for Migliorini. But when she went to meet him in a restaurant in Sydney, Australia, he didn’t match the description Sisely gave her. Nor did they ever have sex. Catarina Migliorini said she did not see any of the money she was supposed to make from selling her virginity.

She also claims Mr Sisely did not cover her traveling expenses, or give her the $780,000 paid by Natsu; and she now believes that ‘Natsu’ doesn’t exist, and that the auction was simply a ploy to gain media coverage for the documentary.

She also says that the idea she would have sex at the end of the documentary was not a definite when the documentary was first announced in May 2010.

“Justin made me believe this was a serious documentary about young virgins and said that there might or might not be an auction at the end of the documentary,” she said.

Sisely helped set up the auction, along with one for a young man named Alexander Stepanov, a male who auctioned his virginity for $3,000.

“I agreed to go along with it, because Justin said it would be the best way to draw attention from the media about the project,” she added.

Miss Migliorini’s move sparked outrage across the globe, with many claiming she was little more than a prostitute.

“There’s a fine line there in terms of legalities,” Sisely said. “We do not intend to break laws. We have created the right processes so we can achieve it. My understanding is solicitation is illegal, depending on where you are, and prostitution is not illegal, in Australia. Soliciting is putting a person in a situation where they otherwise wouldn’t do something sexually, and prostitution is sex for money.”

It’s not the first time Migliorini and Sisely have disagreed in public. In an interview with the Huffington Post after Migliorini announced that she would donate the majority of her earnings to charity, Sisely suggested it might have been an inauthentic gesture, says IBT.

“I was surprised she said that because in all my dealings with her, she made it clear that it was a business decision for her,” Sisely said then. “Now, given how big this story is in Brazil, she’s trapped. If she doesn’t give any money to charity, she’s going to look bad.”

Share this article

We welcome comments that advance the story directly or with relevant tangential information. We try to block comments that use offensive language, all capital letters or appear to be spam, and we review comments frequently to ensure they meet our standards. If you see a comment that you believe is irrelevant or inappropriate, you can flag it to our editors by using the report abuse links. Views expressed in the comments do not represent those of Coinspeaker Ltd.