Apple’s Jonathan Ive Seen Risking iOS 7 Delay on Software Overhaul

Jonathan Ive, Apple’s new senior vice president of industrial design and the visionary behind its hardware products, wants dramatically change software iOS 7, what may cause its delay.

Ive, 46, has begun revamping iPhone and iPad applications, shunning realistic images, such as wood bookshelves for the Newsstand feature, and he’s exploring more dramatic changes to the e-mail and calendar tools, said the people, who asked not to be identified because the plans are private. Photo: Sembilan Serba /Flickr

Jonathan Ive is taking his new job as head of iOS design at Apple very seriously. So seriously, in fact, that it might cause a delay for the latest version of the operating system powering iPhones, iOS 7.

Ive made a name for himself as Steve Jobs’ trusted hardware designer. When he was put in charge of software design at the company, it took some by surprise, informs CNet.

Ive, just six months since taking over for ousted Scott Forstall as head of iOS design, has been going over the next iteration of the software, iOS 7, with a fine-toothed comb.

His oversight and desire to dramatically change some parts of the software could cause the operating system to fall behind its scheduled launch date.

Already in charge of product design, Ive assumed oversight of the look and feel of software running all Apple electronics in a shakeup by Chief Executive Officer Tim Cook last year that included the departure of software chief Scott Forstall.

Rumor has it that the new operating system will be simple and “flat.” Anonymous sources from Apple told All Things D that iOS 7 will be “de-glitzed” and the design will get “a much-needed ‘de-Forstallization.’”

Ive, 46, has begun revamping iPhone and iPad applications, shunning realistic images, such as wood bookshelves for the Newsstand feature, and he’s exploring more dramatic changes to the e-mail and calendar tools, said the people, who asked not to be identified because the plans are private, says Bloomberg

More than just re-skins, as the changes in system-wide interface design seems to be at this point, Ive is also said to be re-thinking software usability, the way he’s traditionally rethought hardware.

The style of images will likely change, as well as users work with some tasks, as deleting an e-mail or entering a calendar item.

While there have been incremental changes over the years, including unified inbox, VIP inbox, threaded messages, week view, etc.

Mail and Calendar’s core interfaces are the same as when they were introduced back in 2007. Since then, different takes on the concept, including apps like Mailbox, Gmail, Fantastical, Horizon Calendar and more, have gained tremendous popularity.

The introduction of new features, along with an emphasis on cooperation and deliberation, comes at a cost for Cupertino, California-based Apple. Engineers are racing to finish iOS 7, the next version of the mobile software, in time for a June preview at Apple’s annual Worldwide Developers Conference.

It is extected that iOS 7 will be unveil next month at the Worldwide Developers Conference (WWDC). Apple try to demonstrate new improvements in the software each year, however most of them simply stay behind the scenes.

According to the Huff Post, Apple has been struggling lately, and a redesign might be exactly what it needs.Apple’s profit fell 18 percent in the first quarter of 2013, and the company is likely to go almost whole year without a major new product.

Some of that consternation has to do with Apple’s much-criticized Maps application, which was rolled out with the latest major software update to the iPhone, iOS 6.

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