A ‘Dad’ is 10th Most Popular Christmas List Request for Children

NEW YORK | Tuesday, December 25th, 2012 6:30am EDT

A ‘dad’ is tenth most popular Christmas list request for children with youngsters happy to forgo the latest iPad, toy or new pet, a survey has found.

A Dad is 10th Most Popular Christmas List Request for Children 01

A baby brother or sister is the most requested present on youngsters’ letters to Santa. Photo: Alan Cleaver/Flickr

When it comes to Christmas, it might be safe to assume children will ask Santa for an extensive list of toys, games and treats.

But according to a survey of kids typical lists for Father Christmas, which was conducted among 2000 British parents, has shown many have more serious concerns, requesting “a dad” instead.

According to the Telegraph, a study of British parents found out that most children will put a new baby brother or sister at the top of their Christmas list, closely followed by a request for a real-life reindeer.

The third most popular choice appeared to be a lovely “pet horse”, while the fourth place was taken be a bizarre request of a “car”.

Eve though there were a lot of material requests on the list, the tenth most popular Christmas wish on the list was a “Dad”.

Traditional desire of a white Christmas was represented by a wish for “snow”, which occupied the ninth place, with sensible youngsters also requesting a “house”.

The survey, of consumers at Westfield London and Westfield Stratford City, also showed that children from the age of three to 12 years also wanted a dog, chocolate and a stick of rock.

Among the top 50 festive demands, 17 related to pets and animals. Actually, some very imaginative children were hoping for a donkey, chicken and elephant. Also among the most odd and original requests were the moon, a time machine, a pond cover and beetroot.

Some modern gadgets like iPhones and iPads also appeared on the list.

Celebrities were a popular choice as stocking fillers, with one child asking for Eva Longoria and another wishing Harry from One Direction would come knocking on the door on Christmas morning.

A request for a “mum” reached number 23 on the list.

Another Chritsmas related research was conducted by the online “jobs and career community”, asking American workers what they want most from employers this holiday season.

The top work-related resolutions are part of an annual Glassdoor survey which looks at feedback from more than 2,000 U.S. based employees and job seekers to find out not only what is top of mind come the New Year, but also get their take on gifts from employers.

It won’t be a surprise to say that  “cash” tops the list. According to the survey, 76 percent of workers this year say they are “eligible” for a cash bonus in 2012, and 73% percent of employees “want a cash bonus most” of all. In fact, they’d even give up the traditional holiday office party if they could get hold of a bit more moola – even if the party came with an open bar!

Raises remain nearly as popular a perk, with 60 percent of workers surveyed saying they’d like to earn a bit more money in 2013 -though that’s down from 62 percent last year. In contrast, immediate gratification is gaining in popularity, with the cash bonus a bit more popular this year than last, reports the Glassdoor.

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