Christmas Tree’ Gifts Under X-ray Machine by Artist Hugh Turvey [Gallery]

NEW YORK | Wednesday, December 12th, 2012 4:52am EDT

From iPads to perfume – the gifts that Hugh Turvey, the British Institute of Radiology artist in residence, discovered is sure to put you in the Christmas spirit.

  • Beauty products. Photo: Hugh TurveyBeauty products. Photo: Hugh Turvey
  • A remote control toy quad bike. Photo: Hugh TurveyA remote control toy quad bike. Photo: Hugh Turvey
  • A necklace in a gift box. Photo: Hugh TurveyA necklace in a gift box. Photo: Hugh Turvey
  • A pair of socks in a gift box. Photo: Hugh TurveyA pair of socks in a gift box. Photo: Hugh Turvey
  • A bracelet in a gift box. Photo: Hugh TurveyA bracelet in a gift box. Photo: Hugh Turvey
  • A digital camera in a gift box. Photo: Hugh TurveyA digital camera in a gift box. Photo: Hugh Turvey
  • A teddy bear in a gift bag. Photo: Hugh TurveyA teddy bear in a gift bag. Photo: Hugh Turvey
  • An Apple iPad in a presentation box. Photo: Hugh TurveyAn Apple iPad in a presentation box. Photo: Hugh Turvey
  • A hamper containing wine bottles, biscuits, a jar of chutney and a Christmas pudding. Photo: Hugh TurveyA hamper containing wine bottles, biscuits, a jar of chutney and a Christmas pudding. Photo: Hugh Turvey
  • A wristwatch in a gift box. Photo: Hugh TurveyA wristwatch in a gift box. Photo: Hugh Turvey

No-one – children and adults alike – can help but get excited when they see presents under the tree.

And surely most of us have been tempted in the weeks before Christmas to hunt in cupboards to see where the presents are hidden, or give a wrapped parcel a quick shake.

But one excited radiologist, 41 years young, could not stand the wait anymore – so he placed his presents into an X-ray machine to see what secrets he could unearth.

And what Hugh Turvey, the British Institute of Radiology artist-in-residence, discovered inside is sure to put you in the Christmas spirit.

Naturally, Hugh is not really taking a sneak-peak at his own gifts, but exploring the art of X-Rays.

As well as the insides of the parcels, the rays also give us details of the gifts themselves – from the microchips of an iPad to the springs within a ballpoint pen.

Hugh created the images, which he calls Xograms, by exposing each object to photons for up to a minute in an X-Ray machine.

He said: ‘My pictures show a selection of wrapped presents revealed using x-ray technology.

‘I thought to myself – haven’t we all guessed and speculated over what we were getting in our presents?

‘I was also curious to see how much the packaging accounted for the overall volume of the presents.’

He added: ‘I have been working with x-ray for over 20 years and never get tired of seeing things I shouldn’t.

‘So I put on what I call my my x-ray specs and had a sneaky peek. I wondered whether someone had tried to hide the identity of a present by packing it in a different shape box.
‘I guess the only challenge will be looking surprised on Christmas day when I’m opening my presents.’

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