Apple CEO Tim Cook Announces Plans to Make a Line of Macs in USA

Apple CEO Tim Cook revealed that one of the existing Mac lines will be manufactured exclusively in the United States next year. This announcement comes a week after recent rumors in the blogosphere sparked by iMacs inscribed in the back with “Assembled in USA.”

Apple CEO Tim Cook revealed that one of the existing Mac lines will be manufactured exclusively in the U.S. next year, making the comments during an exclusive interview with Brian Williams airing tonight at 10pm on NBC’s “Rock Center.” Photo: NBC News

Most of Apple’s gadgets from the last decade or so were assembled in China, but some of those new iMacs have a label saying “Assembled in USA”.  Well, according to Apple CEO Tim Cook, there is going to be a lot more of those.

Apple CEO Tim Cook revealed that one of the existing Mac lines will be manufactured exclusively in the United States next year.

In an interview on “Rock Center with Brian Williams” on Thursday, December 6, Cook said that a line of Apple’s Mac computers will be manufactured in the U.S. in 2013.

“We’ve been working for years on doing more and more in the United States,” Mr. Cook said.

Cook was asked why Apple isn’t a made-in-America company: “You know, this iPhone, as a matter of fact; the engine in here is made in America. And not only are the engines in here made in America, but engines are made in America and are exported.”

“The glass on this phone is made in Kentucky. And we’ve been working for years on doing more and more in the United States. Next year, we will do one of our existing Mac lines in the United States,” he added.

It was Timothy D. Cook’s first television interview since taking over from his visionary former boss, Steve Jobs, who resigned due to health reasons in August 2011. Jobs died on October 5, 2011, after a long battle with pancreatic cancer.

According to the Mashable, the move follows Google’s decision to manufacture its media streamer, the Nexus Q in the U.S., which Google itself described as an “experiment”. Apple’s decision to move some of its production back from China is another sign that manufacturing of consumer electronics components might be making a comeback to the U.S. Even

President Barack Obama has said that many of these jobs will remain on foreign soil. “[T]here are some jobs that are not going to come back, because they’re low-wage, low-skill jobs,” Obama said during a pre-election debate in October.

The announcement could be good news for a country that has been struggling with an unemployment rate of around 8 percent for some time and has been bleeding good-paying factory jobs to lower-wage nations such as China.

“[W]e have a responsibility to create jobs,” Tim Cook said in his interview. “I don’t think we have a responsibility to create a certain kind of job, but I think we do have a responsibility to create jobs […] Over 60 percent of our sales are outside the United States. So we have a responsibility to others as well. But this is our home market, and I take all of those very seriously—jobs, education, giving back, the environment.”

During Mr Cook’s first year as Apple’s permanent chief executive the firm has introduced an array of new products, including an updated iPhone, iMacs, iPods and MacBooks, as well as the iPad Mini. Its stock has risen by more than 40 per cent since he took over.

In his interview with Bloomberg’s Business Week Tim Cook said: “In creating these great products we focus on enriching people’s lives—a higher cause for the product. These are the macro things that drive the company. They haven’t changed. They’re not changing. I will not witness or permit those changes because that’s what makes the company so special.”

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