Windows 8 Sales Hit 40 Million in a Month, Microsoft Reports

Microsoft Corp has sold 40 million Windows 8 licenses in the month since the launch, setting a faster pace than Windows 7 three years ago, the company announced Tuesday.

Microsoft Corp. has sold 40 million Windows 8 licenses in the month since the launch, according to Tami Reller, one of the new co-heads of the Windows unit, setting a faster pace than Windows 7 three years ago. Photo: Microsoft Corp.

It is unreal to find any reports of slow Windows 8 sales. Microsoft announced on Tuesday that it has sold more than 40 million licenses of Windows 8.

Microsoft Corp has sold 40 million Windows 8 licenses in the month since the launch, according to one of the new co-heads of the Windows unit, setting a faster pace than Windows 7 three years ago.

The rapid adoption isn’t all that surprising, considering that the launch occurred on Oct. 26 — just before the holiday shopping season began.

The sales number represents a solid but unspectacular start for the touch-friendly operating system designed to combat Apple Inc’s and Google Inc’s domination of mobile computing, which has shunted aside PCs in favor of iPads and smartphones.

Upgrades to the new operating system from previous Windows versions are outpacing Windows 7’s early rate, Reller said.

That’s also not surprising: Microsoft has been offering $40 upgrades to Windows 8 during a promotional period (which ends Jan. 31) to anyone with a PC that runs Windows XP, Vista or 7. Customers who bought Windows 7 PCs since June were also offered $15 upgrades to Windows 8.

But some say the new system may be hard to adapt to both PC and tablet format and that businesses may be slow to adopt Windows 8.

As it is written in the Official Press Release on the Windows blog, Tami Reller shared this news with industry and financial analysts, investors and media today at the Credit Suisse 2012 Annual Technology Conference.

Windows 8 is outpacing Windows 7 in terms of upgrades. We built Windows 8 to work great on existing Windows 7 PCs. And we also set out to make upgrading from Windows 7 to Windows 8 super easy.

From Tami’s presentation: “The journey is just beginning, but I am pleased to announce today that we have sold 40 million Windows 8 licenses so far.”

Windows president Steven Sinofsky will depart Microsoft and, effective immediately, his duties will be divided between a pair of executives who will answer directly to chief executive Steven Ballmer.

Reller was asked about Sinofsky’s departure during the Q&A part of her presentation. She emphasized: “The team holistically is in great, great shape. And the product is in great shape.”

She added: “I think transitions are always somewhat of a challenge, but I think that timing-wise it is a reasonable time, and the team is busy.”

Julie Larson-Green was promoted to lead Windows software and hardware engineering. Reller will run the business side of Windows in addition to her duties as chief financial officer.

Gadgets NDTV reports that, earlier it was announced by Microsoft that it had sold more than 750,000 Xbox game consoles in the United States last week, including the day after Thanksgiving, one of the country’s biggest shopping days.

That is down from 960,000 sales in the same week a year ago, in line with reduced computer game spending across the board this year, as gamers hold off on purchases in the tight economy and move toward free online games.

Microsoft has not disclosed sales data for its new Surface tablet computer, which uses Windows 8, and was launched at the same time as the operating system. For more information you can visit the Official Microsoft Blog.

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