‘World Building of the Year’: the World Architecture Festival Awards 2012 [Gallery]

World Architecture Festival is the world’s largest festival and live awards competition dedicated to celebrating, and sharing architectural excellence from across the globe.
Now in its fifth year, the World Architecture Festival has welcomed over 8000 attendees to date. WAF 2012 is the most packed World Architecture Festival date with more seminars, keynotes, crit presentations, learning and networking opportunities than ever before.

  • Future projects Culture: Beijing Artist Village Gallery Product - Aedas Beijing. Photo: Aedas BeijingFuture projects Culture: Beijing Artist Village Gallery Product - Aedas Beijing. Photo: Aedas Beijing
  • Future Projects House: C3 House, Wanaka, New Zealand - RTA Studio. Photo: RTA StudioFuture Projects House: C3 House, Wanaka, New Zealand - RTA Studio. Photo: RTA Studio
  • Future projects Residential - Terasa 153, Montenegro - Sanjay Puri Architects. Photo: Sanjay Puri ArchitectsFuture projects Residential - Terasa 153, Montenegro - Sanjay Puri Architects. Photo: Sanjay Puri Architects
  • Future Projects Commercial - Mixed-Use - JST Product Complex in Tsuyama, Japan - Osamu Morishita Architecct & Associates. Photo: Osamu Morishita Architecct & AssociatesFuture Projects Commercial - Mixed-Use - JST Product Complex in Tsuyama, Japan - Osamu Morishita Architecct & Associates. Photo: Osamu Morishita Architecct & Associates
  • Future projects Commercial, Leisure-led development - Gunoot Eco Resort, Oman - SSH. Photo: Waleed ShaalanFuture projects Commercial, Leisure-led development - Gunoot Eco Resort, Oman - SSH. Photo: Waleed Shaalan
  • Future Projects Experimental - Man-Built Islands Dongqian Lake Concept Design, Ningbo, China - HASSELL. Photo: HASSELLFuture Projects Experimental - Man-Built Islands Dongqian Lake Concept Design, Ningbo, China - HASSELL. Photo: HASSELL
  • Office: Darling Quarter in Sydney, Australia - designed by Francis-Jones Morehen Thorp. Photo: Francis-Jones Morehen ThorpOffice: Darling Quarter in Sydney, Australia - designed by Francis-Jones Morehen Thorp. Photo: Francis-Jones Morehen Thorp
  • New and Old: Plaza Espana in Adeje, Spain - designed by Menis Arquitectos SLP. Photo: Menis Arquitectos SLPNew and Old: Plaza Espana in Adeje, Spain - designed by Menis Arquitectos SLP. Photo: Menis Arquitectos SLP
  • Hotel and Leisure: Victoria Tower, Sweden, designed by WingÃ¥rdh Arkitektkontor. Photo: WingÃ¥rdh ArkitektkontorHotel and Leisure: Victoria Tower, Sweden, designed by WingÃ¥rdh Arkitektkontor. Photo: WingÃ¥rdh Arkitektkontor
  • House: Stacking Green, Vietnam - designed by Vo Trong Nghia Architects. Photo: Vo Trong Nghia ArchitectsHouse: Stacking Green, Vietnam - designed by Vo Trong Nghia Architects. Photo: Vo Trong Nghia Architects
  • Culture: Liyuan Library, Beijing, China - designed by Li Xiadong Atelier. Photo: Li Xiadong AtelierCulture: Liyuan Library, Beijing, China - designed by Li Xiadong Atelier. Photo: Li Xiadong Atelier
  • Shopping Centres: T-Site, Tokyo, Japan - Klein Dytham Architects. Photo: Klein Dytham ArchitectsShopping Centres: T-Site, Tokyo, Japan - Klein Dytham Architects. Photo: Klein Dytham Architects
  • Civic and Community: Salorge / Town Community in Pornic, France - designed by Arcau. Photo: ArcauCivic and Community: Salorge / Town Community in Pornic, France - designed by Arcau. Photo: Arcau
  • Health: The Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne, Australia - Billard Leece Partnership and Bates Smart. Photo: Billard Leece Partnership and Bates SmartHealth: The Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne, Australia - Billard Leece Partnership and Bates Smart. Photo: Billard Leece Partnership and Bates Smart
  • Higher Education & Research: Campus for Central Saint Martins, London - Stanton Williams. Photo: Stanton WilliamsHigher Education & Research: Campus for Central Saint Martins, London - Stanton Williams. Photo: Stanton Williams
  • Schools: Binh Duong School, Vietnam - Vo Trong Nghia Architects. Photo: Vo Trong Nghia ArchitectsSchools: Binh Duong School, Vietnam - Vo Trong Nghia Architects. Photo: Vo Trong Nghia Architects
  • Sport: Fazenda Boa Vista Golf Clubhouse, Brazil - designed by Isay Weinfeld. Photo: Isay WeinfeldSport: Fazenda Boa Vista Golf Clubhouse, Brazil - designed by Isay Weinfeld. Photo: Isay Weinfeld
  • Transport: Bodrum International Airport, Turkey - Tabanlioglu Architects. Photo: Tabanlioglu ArchitectsTransport: Bodrum International Airport, Turkey - Tabanlioglu Architects. Photo: Tabanlioglu Architects
  • Future Project of the Year - Msheireb – Heart of Doha, Qatar - designed by AECO. Photo: AECOFuture Project of the Year - Msheireb – Heart of Doha, Qatar - designed by AECO. Photo: AECO
  • The awards are divided into three main sections: Completed Buildings, Landscape Architecture, and Future Projects (for designs in progress). Landscape of the Year - Kallang River Bishan Park, Singapore - designed by Atelier Dreiseitl. Photo: Atelier DreiseitlThe awards are divided into three main sections: Completed Buildings, Landscape Architecture, and Future Projects (for designs in progress). Landscape of the Year - Kallang River Bishan Park, Singapore - designed by Atelier Dreiseitl. Photo: Atelier Dreiseitl
  • Cooled Conservatories at Gardens by the Bay, Singapore, has won the World Building of the Year Award at the prestigious World Architecture Festival (WAF) Awards 2012. The project was designed by Wilkinson Eyre, Grant Associates, Atelier One and Atelier Ten. Located in Marina Bay, Gardens by the Bay is a key project in delivering the Singapore Government’s vision of transforming Singapore into a ‘City in a Garden’. At a total of 101 hectares, the Gardens by the Bay project comprises three distinct waterfront gardens – Bay South, Bay East and Bay Central. Sitting in the heart of Bay South Garden, the Cooled Conservatory Complex provides a spectacular, all-weather attraction, comprising a 1.28 hectare cool dry conservatory (the ‘Flower Dome’) and a 0.73 hectare cool moist conservatory (the ‘Cloud Forest’). Each has its own distinct character, but both explore the horticulture of those environments most likely to be affected by climate change. Photo: Craig Sheppard 2012Cooled Conservatories at Gardens by the Bay, Singapore, has won the World Building of the Year Award at the prestigious World Architecture Festival (WAF) Awards 2012. The project was designed by Wilkinson Eyre, Grant Associates, Atelier One and Atelier Ten. Located in Marina Bay, Gardens by the Bay is a key project in delivering the Singapore Government’s vision of transforming Singapore into a ‘City in a Garden’. At a total of 101 hectares, the Gardens by the Bay project comprises three distinct waterfront gardens – Bay South, Bay East and Bay Central. Sitting in the heart of Bay South Garden, the Cooled Conservatory Complex provides a spectacular, all-weather attraction, comprising a 1.28 hectare cool dry conservatory (the ‘Flower Dome’) and a 0.73 hectare cool moist conservatory (the ‘Cloud Forest’). Each has its own distinct character, but both explore the horticulture of those environments most likely to be affected by climate change. Photo: Craig Sheppard 2012

Singapore’s Gardens by the Bay has won the top prize at WAF, World Building of the Year, on it’s home territory.

Officially the prize went to Wilkinson Eyre Architects for the design of the Cooled Conservatories, but festival director Paul Finch stressed at the awards ceremony that this was a magnificent team effort and that the whole team should be recognised – in addition to the architect, the landscape architect Grant Associates and engineers Atelier One and Atelier Ten.

Finch said, ‘Choosing a winner was a tough decision, but the winner is a scheme of the highest quality. The jury was insistent that the project should be recognised in the round  and that all the design team should have recognition.’

He continued, ‘A first-rate client had a vision and a strategy.The result is not an experimental building but its ventilation strategy has an experimental component. In a globalised environment, there is so much interest in how we deal with density and this combination of urbanism with a garden that is both an attraction and nature is a wonderful solution.

‘If they can cool these glasshouses through natural cooling, we should ask why it can’t be done in other buildings?’

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