LifeLock: Identity Fraud in a Virtual World

Most of us use the Internet for email, social media, surfing and even banking. So, this brings up the question: “How hack-friendly is your password?”

LifeLock provides its clients with the first-class identity protection using a suite of services backed by state-of-the-art technology. In addition, the company provides information on all aspects of identity theft and threats. Photo: Ben Rabicoff/Flickr

This is a Sponsored post written by me on behalf of LifeLock Twitter for SocialSpark. All opinions are 100% mine.

We live in the modern world, and you give out your personal information everywhere: at your doctor’s office, schools, insurance companies, even to test drive a car.

According to the Wall Street Journal, sloppy security procedures were partly to blame in many breaches affecting millions of identities.

The stats are really shocking as it show that households earning $100k per year have the highest identity fraud rate at 7.4%, while the average cost per person of having identities stolen is $1,513.

11.6 million adults are reported to have become victims of identity fraud in 2011 and a total of $18 billion was lost.

By the way, specialists claim that mostly often the identity information is stolen from the social media. For example, 6.6% of victims are smartphone owners, 6.8% are social media users who click on the applications.

8.2% those who were cheated are social media users who have “checked in” using their smartphone GPS and 10.1% of victims are LinkedIn users.

There’s some more shocking information, which should be born in mind by those who do appreciate their identity information. Do you know How hack-friendly is your password?

A password consisting of 6 characters with no symbol can be stolen by a professional .000224 seconds. It takes hacker up to 20 days to learn a password of 10 characters and one symbol.

To protect themselves from possible leakages, small businesses are relying on defenses filled with holes big enough to drive a truck through.

Which is more, even the US government still uses social security numbers for identification on Medicare Cards.

But have you ever thought what can be done to protect and save you so much personal and sensitive information?

AmeliaIZEA | skitch.com

Let us introduce LifeLock, today’s leader in the world of identity theft protection and information.

LifeLock provides its clients with the first-class identity protection using a suite of services backed by state-of-the-art technology. In addition, the company provides information on all aspects of identity theft and threats.

LifeLock’s protection is based on five stages which include monitoring a client’s identity, scanning for identity threats, responding to identity threat, guarantee for the company’s services, and tracking a client’s credit score.

The company has earned plenty of positive reviews and recommendations since they opened their doors in 2006.  While other similar companies prefer to sit back and enjoy the benefits of the reputation they’ve attained, LifeLock is tirelessly at work, trying to keep criminals from getting their hands on your identity and precious personal information.

LifeLock doesn’t sell customers’ data to third-party firms, so you can be confident that the information you provide is in good hands.

The company’s clients have access to their ‘my LifeLock’ member portal at anytime. Member service representatives are available at any time, day or night, to answer your questions when you have them.

LifeLock’s officie is located in the United States, so you can easily reach the company’s representatives to consult about identity theft protection services that have outsourced their customer service.

Please, visit LifeLock official website or LifeLock on Twitter to learn additional information or share your opinion considering protecting identity and LifeLock or your experience in using it if you have any.

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