British Wildlife Photography Awards 2012 – Winners [Gallery]

NEW YORK | Monday, September 17th, 2012 3:40am EDT

Winners are declared, The British Wildlife Photography Awards 2012. Awards are performed by talented amateurs and professionals in the field of wildlife photography. All the photos, which took part in the competition, had to capture of animals in their natural habitat. This year,the contest was attended by thousands of photographers. Have a look of the amazing photos!

  • WildPix young people’s awards 12-18 winner: Arctic terns. Photo: Ashley ButterworthWildPix young people’s awards 12-18 winner: Arctic terns. Photo: Ashley Butterworth
  • Documentary Series award winner : "A fresh approach to a rural tradition". A female hen harrier returns to its nest with a young grouse chick. Harriers and other moorland raptors can heavily reduce grouse stocks during the breeding season, which inevitably brings them into direct conflict with game shooting interests. An alternative approach to try to reduce the impact of grouse predation by harriers is to provide them with another food source. On Glen Tanar Estate during the 2011 season the single pair of breeding harriers were provided with chunks of venison that the female took to feed her chicks, which resulted in a reduction in the number of grouse taken. Photo: Mark HamblinDocumentary Series award winner : "A fresh approach to a rural tradition". A female hen harrier returns to its nest with a young grouse chick. Harriers and other moorland raptors can heavily reduce grouse stocks during the breeding season, which inevitably brings them into direct conflict with game shooting interests. An alternative approach to try to reduce the impact of grouse predation by harriers is to provide them with another food source. On Glen Tanar Estate during the 2011 season the single pair of breeding harriers were provided with chunks of venison that the female took to feed her chicks, which resulted in a reduction in the number of grouse taken. Photo: Mark Hamblin
  • Documentary Series award winner: A fresh approach to a rural tradition. Clients pay handsomely to shoot red grouse but if there are low numbers of game birds then there are fewer grouse shooting days, which it is argued has significant implications for rural economies and local employment. Photo: Mark HamblinDocumentary Series award winner: A fresh approach to a rural tradition. Clients pay handsomely to shoot red grouse but if there are low numbers of game birds then there are fewer grouse shooting days, which it is argued has significant implications for rural economies and local employment. Photo: Mark Hamblin
  • Documentary series award winner: A fresh approach to a rural tradition. A red grouse adult male in spring plumage is an important game bird whose numbers are maximised on sporting estates through careful management to provide high yields for paying clients during the shooting season. Photo: Mark HamblinDocumentary series award winner: A fresh approach to a rural tradition. A red grouse adult male in spring plumage is an important game bird whose numbers are maximised on sporting estates through careful management to provide high yields for paying clients during the shooting season. Photo: Mark Hamblin
  • Documentary series award winner: A fresh approach to a rural tradition. Muirburn (heather burning) on an upland sporting estate to burn off old growth and promote fresh heather shoots on which red grouse feed. Burning takes place on a 12-year cycle to generate a mosaic of heather patches of different ages as part of red grouse management. Photo: Mark HamblinDocumentary series award winner: A fresh approach to a rural tradition. Muirburn (heather burning) on an upland sporting estate to burn off old growth and promote fresh heather shoots on which red grouse feed. Burning takes place on a 12-year cycle to generate a mosaic of heather patches of different ages as part of red grouse management. Photo: Mark Hamblin
  • British Seasons category winner: Snow hare portfolio. Photo: Jules CoxBritish Seasons category winner: Snow hare portfolio. Photo: Jules Cox
  • British seasons category winner: Snow hare portfolio. Photo: Jules CoxBritish seasons category winner: Snow hare portfolio. Photo: Jules Cox
  • British seasons category winner: Snow hare portfolio. Photo: Jules CoxBritish seasons category winner: Snow hare portfolio. Photo: Jules Cox
  • In my backyard category winner: Wasp house cleaning. Photo: David HandleyIn my backyard category winner: Wasp house cleaning. Photo: David Handley
  • Living landscapes category winner: Culm divided. Photo: Stephen PowlesLiving landscapes category winner: Culm divided. Photo: Stephen Powles
  • Wild woods category winner: New Forest in autumn. Photo: Jeremy WalkerWild woods category winner: New Forest in autumn. Photo: Jeremy Walker
  • Wildlife behaviour category winner: Herring gull and puffin. Photo: Amanda HayesWildlife behaviour category winner: Herring gull and puffin. Photo: Amanda Hayes
  • Hidden Britain category winner: Leap for freedom. Photo: Dale SuttonHidden Britain category winner: Leap for freedom. Photo: Dale Sutton
  • Habitat category winner: Grey seal in underwater cave. Photo:  Alexander MustardHabitat category winner: Grey seal in underwater cave. Photo: Alexander Mustard
  • Urban wildlife category winner: Starlings watching starlings. Photo: Phil JonesUrban wildlife category winner: Starlings watching starlings. Photo: Phil Jones
  • Animal portraits category winner: Red deer stag in pine forest. Photo: Neil McIntyreAnimal portraits category winner: Red deer stag in pine forest. Photo: Neil McIntyre
  • Overall winner and coast and marine category awards: Gannet Jacuzzi. Photo: Dr Matt DoggettOverall winner and coast and marine category awards: Gannet Jacuzzi. Photo: Dr Matt Doggett

The British Wildlife Photography Awards were established to recognise the talents of wildlife photographers of all nationalities practising in Britain, whilst at the same time highlighting the great wealth and diversity of Britain’s natural history.

The driving motivation to set up the Awards evolved through the nation’s growing awareness of the local environment and the need for its protection.

Now in its fourth year, this highly acclaimed and unique wildlife photography competition has captivated the nation, with outstanding and beautiful imagery. It is a celebration of British wildlife as well as a showcase for the country’s leading nature photographers both amateur and professional.

With twelve separate categories, the subject matter covers everything from marine life and animal behaviour to creepy crawlies and urban wildlife; the results have beautifully revealed the unseen splendour and surprising diversity of Britain’s wildlife. Unlike other wildlife competitions the Awards are uniquely British.

With a prize fund of up to £20,000 and the overall winner receiving a cash prize of £5,000, the images receiving judges’ commendations will form part of a series of nationwide exhibitions.

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