One Ticket Sold in Michigan Wins $320 Million in ‘Powerball’ Lottery

A ticket sold in Michigan matched all five numbers including the Powerball to win the $320 million jackpot

A single ticket sold at a gas station in Michigan matched all five numbers and the red Powerball to win the $320 million Powerball lottery jackpot, the 10th largest prize in U.S. history, lottery officials said Thursday. These are the winning numbers that were selected at 11 p.m. Wednesday: 6, 27, 46, 51 and 56. The Powerball drawn was 21. Photo: Powerball.com

A single ticket sold in Michigan matched all five numbers and the red “Powerball” to win the $320 million Powerball lottery jackpot, the 10th largest prize in U.S. history, according to Powerball.com.

Wednesday’s night’s winning numbers were 6, 27, 46, 51, 56 and the Powerball was 21.

Wednesday’s top jackpot prize is valued at a whopping $320 million — or about $213 million for players who chose the cash option — because no lottery players have matched all the winning numbers during the past seven weeks, writes NJ.com.

The $320 million prize was the fourth-largest in the history of the game, which is played in 42 states plus the District of Columbia and the Virgin Islands.

According to NBC, the $320 million ticket was sold in Lapeer, about 45 miles north of Detroit.

Eight tickets matched five of the winning numbers to win $1 million. One more ticket sold in Nebraska added the Power Play to win $2 million.

The odds of winning the Powerball jackpot are 1 in 175 million and the odds of winning any prize are 1 in 31.

Tickets, which start at $2, are on sale until about one hour (times vary by state) before the 10:59 p.m. ET drawing. Five white numbered balls are drawn from a drum with 59 balls and one red Powerball from a drum with 35 numbered red balls.

Every American dreams of winning a lottery and pictures this moment. “I can’t even really think of what I wouldn’t do,” 7-Eleven customer Shelley Taylor told NBC station WBAL of Baltimore, about dreams of winning the jackpot.

However, ABC News recalls the story of Holly Lahti who won the $190 million Mega Millions jackpot in January, 2011.

A few days after her win, a mug shot of Lahti sporting a black eye and bruises, along with a mug shot of her estranged husband, Joshua, had become the image the world associated with America’s newest millionaire.

After that, Lahti, who worked at a bank in her small hometown of Rathdrum, Idaho, dissapeared. She gave no public statements about the lottery winnings, quit her job, asked the media not to contact her, disconnected her phone numbers, and eventually moved from Rathdrum without a trace.

Workers at Lahti’s former employer, Inland Northwest Bank in Post Falls, said that Lahti had quit and no longer lived nearby.

In May, however, Lahti, who is the mother of two attended a fundraiser at her former place of employment, Inland Northwest Bank in Post Falls. She refused to be interviewed by the local newspaper, which called the event Lahti’s first public appearance since winning the jackpot.

“Privacy is still her big concern and, as a result, I don’t ask any questions that would violate that privacy,” bank employee Ron Jacobson told the local newspaper, the Coeur D’Alene Press. “I did tell her that she looked and sounded happier and less stressed than the last time we spoke.”

As ABC News points out, Lahti’s story may serve as a cautionary tale to lottery hopefuls buying tickets to today’s drawing of the Powerball jackpot. A flood of media scrutiny, requests for monetary hand-outs, and publicity typically floods winners of the major lottery games.

Share this article

We welcome comments that advance the story directly or with relevant tangential information. We try to block comments that use offensive language, all capital letters or appear to be spam, and we review comments frequently to ensure they meet our standards. If you see a comment that you believe is irrelevant or inappropriate, you can flag it to our editors by using the report abuse links. Views expressed in the comments do not represent those of Coinspeaker Ltd.