IQ Tests: Women Undertake Men For the First Time in 100 Years

A recent study showed that female IQ scores have risen above men’s for the first time.

It seems like women have finally won a decisive victory in the battle of the sexes. Photo: Design Tram/Flickr

Since IQ testing began 100 years ago, females have been as much as five points behind, leading psychologists to suggest embedded genetic differences.

The results of the study were published by James Flynn, a world-renowned authority on IQ tests, who believes the demands of the modern age are raising standards of intelligence, writes The Telegraph.

He explained: “In the last 100 years the IQ scores of both men and women have risen, but women’s have risen faster.

“This is a consequence of modernity. The complexity of the modern world is making our brains adapt and raising our IQ. The full effect of modernity on women is only just emerging.”

Some experts suggested that such results were achieve due to the demands of juggling family life and building a career what have made women more intelligent.

As for the other theories, one of them claims that females have always had the potential for higher results, but are only now realizing it.

Flynn said: “The brains of modern people are growing differently and showing increased cognitive complexity which we measure as increases in IQ.”

He continued: “This improvement is more marked for women than for men because they were disadvantaged in the past.”

Women are more than capable of taking on the stereotypically-male hunter-gatherer role, agreed Helena Jamieson, 33, a consultant at Cambridge.

She said of her marriage to stay-at home father Luke, 37: “We have done the role reversal. I’m definitely the more intellectual person in the relationship and I’m at work full time while he is raising our daughter.”

Helena continued: “I think women probably always knew deep down that they were the more intelligent ones – but as the gentler sex we were quiet about it and let men continue to believe they ruled the world.”

However, the history of IQ testing is quite controversial as it shows differences between genders and races.

The “Flynn Effect” demonstrated that the results of testing in western countries increased by roughly three point a decade.

Bearing this statistics in mind, it can be concluded that Caucasian westerners score about 30 points more than people living 100 years ago. It also proved that IQ was not genetic and could be improved.

To test the idea, Flynn, emeritus professor of political studies at the University of Otago in Dunedin, New Zealand, collated new IQ tests from countries in western Europe and from America, New Zealand, Canada, Argentina and Estonia.

The results of the study showed that in westernised countries the gap between men and women had become trivial, reports The Australian.

“What we are seeing here is the impact of modernity,” said Flynn. “As the world gets more complex, and living in it demands more abstract thought, so people are adapting. I suspect that the same trends are happening in Britain, too, although the data is too sparse to be sure.”

“The brains of modern people are growing differently and showing increased cognitive complexity which we measure as increases in IQ.”

“This improvement is more marked for women than for men because they were more disadvantaged in the past,” Flynn added.

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