Audi A6 Stars in Television Drama: ‘Untitled Jersey City Project’ [Video]

Untitled Jersey City Project is an experiment of FX Networks. They called it a work-in-progress television drama, which consists of eight short-form episodes that are fragments from a larger story, with many of the story threads left unresolved.

Untitled Jersey City Project is an experiment of FX Networks. They called it a work-in-progress television drama. Untitled Jersey City Project  consists of eight short-form episodes that are fragments from a larger story, with many of the story threads left unresolved. But from these eight episodes, this much is clear.

The story is set amidst the fast-developing Jersey City waterfront, just across the river from Manhattan, says Untitled Jersey City Project website. A shining new city is being built on the edge of this gritty town. But while the glass office towers and condos are sleek and new, the rules of the game haven’t changed one bit.

The “Untitled Jersey City Project” spots are each more than two minutes long, ending with the FX web address for the series.

Via the FX site, they’re also “likeable” on Facebook, downloadable and tweetable, and through an “Untitled Jersey City Project” YouTube channel, shareable on multiple platforms, options that didn’t exist for “The Hire” in 2002.

“This is basically a short-form, micro series,” says John Solberg, senior vice president of public relations for FX. “Untitled Jersey City Project” centers around Frank George and Ray Rahne, two Manhattan architects commissioned to design a stadium complex in Jersey City.

A working class kid who did good, Frank studied architecture at Columbia in New York City, not far from his hometown of Elizabeth, New Jersey. Fresh out of school he worked for some of the biggest, boldest names in the field, before opening up his own shop with his friend and colleague, Ray Rahne.

Frank’s got an architect’s ego and a Jersey kid’s street smarts, but even he can tell he’s in over his head. Now his career-making commission is turning into a nightmare, and he’s falling for what might be the wrong girl at the wrong time.

Their client is Larry Tyerman, a powerful local developer. George hears a mysterious message from his partner who ends up dead following a 39-floor plummet from the construction site. He’s then faced with — wait for it — intrigue and danger as he tries to find out what happened to Rahne.

Among the cast of characters is Jane Kaplan. Jane grew up on the mean streets of Greenwich, Connecticut and studied journalism at Penn. Her dream is to be an editor at The New York Times, but first she has to make a name for herself.

For now that’s the metro beat at The Ledger, where her exposés about Larry Tyerman’s troubled Waterfront Field project have gotten her all kinds of attention – not all of it healthy. Her extracurricular relationship with Frank can’t be anything other than genuine attraction — it has absolutely nothing to do with pumping him for details about Tyerman’s secret bankruptcy filing

And then there’s Mike Gavette, a steward for the ironworkers union on the construction project who suspiciously speaks Chinese. Gavette “seems to have an unusual relationship with the behind-the-scenes investors in the project, the Wi’s,” says an FX description.

Untitled Jersey City Project  was directed by Daniel Minahan, who has directed for high-profile series such as “True Blood,” “Grey’s Anatomy,” “The Good Wife” and “Game of Thrones.”

“Our goal was to create this very thick plot with extensive flashbacks,” says Loren Angelo, general manager for brand marketing at Audi of America, hopefully inspiring more curiosity to follow the story.

“We wanted to construct a story that works for the way people watch things today,” says the project’s writer, Peter Mattei. “On TV, online, in as many episodes as they want, on whatever screen, including their phones.” [via FX Networks and NJ.com]

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