Scientists are 95% Sure That Yetis Exist after They Found Footprints in Siberia

Researchers are claiming they are 95 percent sure that the fabled Russian version of the Abominable Snowman or Big foot lives in the Kemerovo region of Siberia.

A strange footprint found in the snow which the expedition believe belongs to a neanderthal creature. Photo: BBC Russia

“During the expedition to the Azasskaya cave, conference participants gathered indisputable proof that the Shoria mountains are inhabited by the ‘Snow Man’,” the Kemerovo region administration said.

The Russian coal-mining region ofKemerovo said in a statement on its website that footprints and possibly even hair samples belonging to the yeti were found on the research trip to its remote mountains.

The expedition was organised afterKemerovo’s governor invited researchers from the United States,Canada, and several other countries to share their research and stories of encounters with the creature at a conference.

“They found his footprints, his supposed bed, and various markers with which the yeti marks his territory,” the statement said. The collected “artifacts” will be analysed in a special laboratory, it said.

Some possible Yeti hair samples reportedly found in the region by Russian scientist Anatoly Fokin will be studied in a laboratory to determine their origin.

“This does not seem to be any more than what you hear about from weekend excursions in North America that go out, discovering some hair of undetermined origin, calling it ‘Bigfoot hair,’ then locating some broken branches and piled trees, saying it was made by Bigfoot, and finding footprints that look like Sasquatch tracks,” said Loren Coleman, director of the International Cryptozoology Museum in Portland, Maine.

“These are not ‘proof’ that would hold up, zoologically,” Coleman said. Yetis, or Abominable Snowmen, are hairy ape-like creatures of popular myth, that are generally held to inhabit the Himalayas.

Some believeRussiaalso holds a population of yetis, which it calls Snow Men, in remote areas of Siberia.

At the same time, skeptics point out that the area of Siberia that’s allegedly home to the local Yeti legend helps promote tourism. In fact, opening day of the ski season there is known as Day of the Yeti — an attempt to sell many Yeti-related souvenirs and bring in more skiers to the region.

Back in June, creature researchers in California held a press conference soliciting help to get a DNA test that might determine if Bigfoot left physical impressions on the windows of a pickup truck in the Sierra National Forest. [via The Telegraph and Huff Post]

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