Animated Photography: Breathtaking Pictures that Move [Gallery]

Gizmodo introduced a twist to one of their recent photography contests. Participants were asked to create cinemagraphs. Cinemagraphs incorporate animation into still photos resulting in pictures that move!

  • Here is my very first cinemagraph. I wanted to try something I had not seen before which is juxtaposing the same model several times in a photograph...a fashion photo convention that I love...and animating it. It's an interesting still photo convention used to evoke motion. Yet, ironically the motion comes from the "wind" animating the hair and necklace unexpectedly.    It was actually a really painstaking production process that took me several days to figure out and execute. I basically animated each figure and then cut and paste each frame onto the final canvas. I wanted a graphic design element to add the feeling of an animating fashion editorial which I had not seen much of either. Photo and caption by Karen NgoHere is my very first cinemagraph. I wanted to try something I had not seen before which is juxtaposing the same model several times in a photograph...a fashion photo convention that I love...and animating it. It's an interesting still photo convention used to evoke motion. Yet, ironically the motion comes from the "wind" animating the hair and necklace unexpectedly. It was actually a really painstaking production process that took me several days to figure out and execute. I basically animated each figure and then cut and paste each frame onto the final canvas. I wanted a graphic design element to add the feeling of an animating fashion editorial which I had not seen much of either. Photo and caption by Karen Ngo
  • For this challenge i wanted to shoot someone in the rain, but it didn't rained hard enough this last days. So I did like a smaller version, with just two drops. I tried different drops, speed, and amount of blur in the background, ending up with this one. I made the gif using After Effects and PS. Photo and caption by Diego RamírezFor this challenge i wanted to shoot someone in the rain, but it didn't rained hard enough this last days. So I did like a smaller version, with just two drops. I tried different drops, speed, and amount of blur in the background, ending up with this one. I made the gif using After Effects and PS. Photo and caption by Diego Ramírez
  • I was out taking pictures in my neighborhood when I came across this open fire hydrant. I thought it would be a great opportunity to add some motion to an otherwise still image. To catch this guy skateboarding and woman walking by at the same time adds to the surrealness of the cinemagraph. It's awesome to create these types of illusions because your brain and eye are expecting movement from the other objects. Shot with a Canon 60D. Photo and caption by Tom McCarthyI was out taking pictures in my neighborhood when I came across this open fire hydrant. I thought it would be a great opportunity to add some motion to an otherwise still image. To catch this guy skateboarding and woman walking by at the same time adds to the surrealness of the cinemagraph. It's awesome to create these types of illusions because your brain and eye are expecting movement from the other objects. Shot with a Canon 60D. Photo and caption by Tom McCarthy
  • Just got 5 husky pups. This one in particular has a very serious looks. And the animation just make her looks more serious while her siblings can't stop playing around. Doesn't make her less cute though. Photo and caption by Zefanya HanataJust got 5 husky pups. This one in particular has a very serious looks. And the animation just make her looks more serious while her siblings can't stop playing around. Doesn't make her less cute though. Photo and caption by Zefanya Hanata
  • When creating this cinemagraph as soon as I saw the lady shaking her head from side to side I knew it had to be included, it just sums up the fact that this shouldn't be happening. The world is moving as usual, but all the people have frozen. It is wrong some how, but comical at the same time.   There's a bit more movement in the scene which some people don't even notice. I've had to scale this down from its original resolution of 4K down to 640x360, so it has got quite small. Photo and caption by Lee SpoonerWhen creating this cinemagraph as soon as I saw the lady shaking her head from side to side I knew it had to be included, it just sums up the fact that this shouldn't be happening. The world is moving as usual, but all the people have frozen. It is wrong some how, but comical at the same time. There's a bit more movement in the scene which some people don't even notice. I've had to scale this down from its original resolution of 4K down to 640x360, so it has got quite small. Photo and caption by Lee Spooner
  • I had always wanted to do something with pen spinning and this is a great method. I recreated my terrifying exam study experience for this challenge. In this photo, I was plotting how to ace my Japanese exam and I ended up writing 6 full pages of notes for practice (which paid off). This was shot with a Panasonic DMC ZS3. For a tripod, I stacked some books on a chair and mounted my camera on an adjustable lamp with masking tape. Though risky, it worked as well as a real tripod! Photo and caption by Kelly H.I had always wanted to do something with pen spinning and this is a great method. I recreated my terrifying exam study experience for this challenge. In this photo, I was plotting how to ace my Japanese exam and I ended up writing 6 full pages of notes for practice (which paid off). This was shot with a Panasonic DMC ZS3. For a tripod, I stacked some books on a chair and mounted my camera on an adjustable lamp with masking tape. Though risky, it worked as well as a real tripod! Photo and caption by Kelly H.
  • The story behind this animation: my friend came to my place overexcited about this "Cinemagraph"/ gif animations. after experimenting with it for the all afternoon we decided to eat something. after having dinner a nice light came out and we decided to go for a last one. Photo and caption by Davide Bellotta, Maartin Hunink and Ingetje WielengaThe story behind this animation: my friend came to my place overexcited about this "Cinemagraph"/ gif animations. after experimenting with it for the all afternoon we decided to eat something. after having dinner a nice light came out and we decided to go for a last one. Photo and caption by Davide Bellotta, Maartin Hunink and Ingetje Wielenga
  • I have been amazed by Jamie's cinemagraphs for a while now and wanted to create something different, something that looped a dynamic object like steam. It took me forever to create a technique that allowed me to loop steam. So, here it is. Hope you enjoy. Photo and caption by Jackson FinterI have been amazed by Jamie's cinemagraphs for a while now and wanted to create something different, something that looped a dynamic object like steam. It took me forever to create a technique that allowed me to loop steam. So, here it is. Hope you enjoy. Photo and caption by Jackson Finter
  • Skateboarding has been a large part of my life for the last 11 years. I've had many broken bones and a few stitches here and there but that doesn't stop me. The thrill of landing a trick down a set of stairs makes the desire to skate that much greater. The gif represents my passion for skating; it never stops. Photo and caption by Robert LundskowSkateboarding has been a large part of my life for the last 11 years. I've had many broken bones and a few stitches here and there but that doesn't stop me. The thrill of landing a trick down a set of stairs makes the desire to skate that much greater. The gif represents my passion for skating; it never stops. Photo and caption by Robert Lundskow
  • When I saw this weeks challenge, I knew I wanted a picture with some sort of an electronic sign (neon sign, crossing sign, traffic light, etc). I grabbed my camera, tripod and my sister along for the ride and headed out to downtown. We were walking past a bar and smoke shop and my sister stopped to check out a hookah pipe and I thought it'd be an interesting capture. I talked to the owner to see if we can shoot outside the store but I was surprised when he wanted to check our IDs. We had to get 'special permission' to shoot in front of the store with my sister, since she was underage. And the owner was nice enough to keep the sign switched on for about 20 minutes even after the store closed up. Photo and caption by Shali HerathWhen I saw this weeks challenge, I knew I wanted a picture with some sort of an electronic sign (neon sign, crossing sign, traffic light, etc). I grabbed my camera, tripod and my sister along for the ride and headed out to downtown. We were walking past a bar and smoke shop and my sister stopped to check out a hookah pipe and I thought it'd be an interesting capture. I talked to the owner to see if we can shoot outside the store but I was surprised when he wanted to check our IDs. We had to get 'special permission' to shoot in front of the store with my sister, since she was underage. And the owner was nice enough to keep the sign switched on for about 20 minutes even after the store closed up. Photo and caption by Shali Herath
  • Here's my submission for the Cinemagraph Contest. I shot this at Patricia Beach, just outside of Winnipeg on Canada Day long weekend with my Panasonic GH2, and the 25mm Voigtlander f/0.95 lens, ISO100. Rather than take a bunch of stills, I've found it makes a lot more sense to take a bunch of video and piece together the cinemagraph from that. Doing it that way allows for some happy accidents like the bird flying overhead. That happened at a much later part of the shot, but I just comped in that one frame where I wanted it.   All of the tutorials I see online recommend you use Photoshop to make these Cinemagraphs, but that seems like the wrong tool for the job... I used Adobe After Effects, since it's built for manipulating video. It's much easier to make things loop properly since you can cross fade the layers over time, and make non-destructive adjustments to your masking which allows for a lot more experimentation and refinement. I did use Photoshop for the final export to an animated GIF, but other than that, it was totally assembled in After Effects. Photo and caption by Kert GartnerHere's my submission for the Cinemagraph Contest. I shot this at Patricia Beach, just outside of Winnipeg on Canada Day long weekend with my Panasonic GH2, and the 25mm Voigtlander f/0.95 lens, ISO100. Rather than take a bunch of stills, I've found it makes a lot more sense to take a bunch of video and piece together the cinemagraph from that. Doing it that way allows for some happy accidents like the bird flying overhead. That happened at a much later part of the shot, but I just comped in that one frame where I wanted it. All of the tutorials I see online recommend you use Photoshop to make these Cinemagraphs, but that seems like the wrong tool for the job... I used Adobe After Effects, since it's built for manipulating video. It's much easier to make things loop properly since you can cross fade the layers over time, and make non-destructive adjustments to your masking which allows for a lot more experimentation and refinement. I did use Photoshop for the final export to an animated GIF, but other than that, it was totally assembled in After Effects. Photo and caption by Kert Gartner

Gizmodo introduced a twist to one of their recent photography contests. Participants were asked to create cinemagraphs. Cinemagraphs incorporate animation into still photos resulting in pictures that move! Seen here is the winning photo which was shot outside Winnipeg, Canada. Check out this slideshow to see the more.

To see the entire collection visit Gizmodo.

Share This article

We welcome comments that advance the story directly or with relevant tangential information. We try to block comments that use offensive language, all capital letters or appear to be spam, and we review comments frequently to ensure they meet our standards. If you see a comment that you believe is irrelevant or inappropriate, you can flag it to our editors by using the report abuse links. Views expressed in the comments do not represent those of Coinspeaker Ltd.