Global Internet Traffic Is Expected to Quadruple by 2015 [Infographic]

Global Internet traffic is expected to quadruple between 2010 and 2015. By that time, nearly 3 billion people will be using the Internet — more than 40% of the world’s projected population.

According to the data provided to Mashable.com by Cisco, Global Internet traffic is expected to quadruple between 2010 and 2015, . By that time, nearly 3 billion people will be using the Internet — more than 40% of the world’s projected population. On average, there will be more than two Internet connections for each person on Earth (nearly 15 billion global network connections), driven by the proliferation of web-enabled mobile devices.

Internet traffic is projected to approach 966 exabytes (nearly 1 zettabyte) per year in 2015 — that’s equivalent of all the digital data in existence in 2010. Regionally speaking, traffic is expected to more than double in the Middle East and Africa, where there will be an average of 0.9 devices per person for a projected population of 1.39 billion. Latin America is close behind, with a 48% increase in traffic and an estimated 2.1 devices per person among a population of 620 million.

The rest of the world will experience more moderate growth in terms of traffic, but the number of devices per person is forecast to increase significantly. By 2015, there will be an average of 5.8 devices per person in North America, 5.4 in Japan and 4.4 in western Europe. By 2015, the world will reach three trillion Internet video minutes per month; that is one million Internet video minutes every second.

Somewhat surprisingly, it is neither mobile phones nor tablets that are expected to grow the most in the next four years. Rather, flat panel televisions will experience the greatest production increase globally, up 1,063% from 2010, followed by tablets (750%), digital photo frames (600%) and ereaders (550%). The number of non-smartphones and smartphones is expected to increase by 17% and 194% worldwide, respectively. [Cisco via Mashable]

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