Light Graffiti Supercars in London by Marc Cameron and Mark Brown [Gallery]

Light graffiti is the art of combining long-exposure photographs with high-intensity light sources waved around in thin air to create an image when the shutter closes.

  • Aston Martin, in rural locations in the Cotswolds. Photo: Marc Cameron and Mark BrownAston Martin, in rural locations in the Cotswolds. Photo: Marc Cameron and Mark Brown
  • Pagani Huayra in front of City Hall. Photo: Marc Cameron and Mark BrownPagani Huayra in front of City Hall. Photo: Marc Cameron and Mark Brown
  • Porsche 918 Spyder in Hays Lane, location of the new Shard building. Photo: Marc Cameron and Mark BrownPorsche 918 Spyder in Hays Lane, location of the new Shard building. Photo: Marc Cameron and Mark Brown
  • Bugatti Veyron. Photo: Marc Cameron and Mark BrownBugatti Veyron. Photo: Marc Cameron and Mark Brown
  • Bugatti Veyron 16.4 Super Sport. Photo: Marc Cameron and Mark BrownBugatti Veyron 16.4 Super Sport. Photo: Marc Cameron and Mark Brown
  • Mastretta MXT on Tower Bridge. Photo: Marc Cameron and Mark BrownMastretta MXT on Tower Bridge. Photo: Marc Cameron and Mark Brown
  • Ferrari 458 Italia. Photo: Marc Cameron and Mark BrownFerrari 458 Italia. Photo: Marc Cameron and Mark Brown
  • Lamborghini Sesto Elemento in front of the 30 St Mary Axe 'Gherkin' building. Photo: Marc Cameron and Mark BrownLamborghini Sesto Elemento in front of the 30 St Mary Axe 'Gherkin' building. Photo: Marc Cameron and Mark Brown
  • Ferrari FF at BBC White City in West London. Photo: Marc Cameron and Mark BrownFerrari FF at BBC White City in West London. Photo: Marc Cameron and Mark Brown
  • Photo: Marc Cameron and Mark BrownPhoto: Marc Cameron and Mark Brown
  • Alfa Romeo 4C Concept at BBC White City. Photo: Marc Cameron and Mark BrownAlfa Romeo 4C Concept at BBC White City. Photo: Marc Cameron and Mark Brown

London’s landmarks have been visited by some weirdly painted supercars. The images are the latest work of entrepreneur Marc Cameron and his photographer Mark Brown. They created the rather awesome ‘Light Graffiti’ cars a while ago.

Using spells known only to Harry Potter fans, the pair managed to ‘paint’ supercars using a long lens in a variety of locations, and for their recent batch, descended on London Town to do a few more. They even popped over to the BBC to paint the Ferrari FF, and stick a virtual Alfa 4C right in front of the Top Gear office. Click through for the pics above.

The duo are secretive about their exact methods but say they use a process of reflecting and refracting LED light to create outlines. Every detail of the vehicles is planned precisely before setting a camera on long exposure to catch the light painting. The entire process can take up to four hours.

While discussing his technique, Mark Brown said: “The technique I use is some what of a trade secret. Without going into too much detail, it’s a mixture of long exposure photography and light trails.”

“Using extended exposures I am able to step in front of the lens and paint with light using the camera as a canvas. Then I use real photographic components as a background for each of the light paintings. Nothing is digitally generated, only stitched together. Each image takes about 2-3 hours to complete.”

London-based Marc Cameron explains: “We previously photographed in areas of the Cotswolds, but for this series of the Light Graffiti Cars we decided to shoot at iconic locations in the Big Smoke, with the cars featured having to be the most visually-stimulating, stunning rides of recent times.”

So, do you like this type of art? Tell us your thoughts in the comments below and don’t forget to check their other works if you like it. [Mark Brown Photography via The Telegraph (UK), My Modern Met and Seven Magazine]

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