Real Life Disney ‘Up’ House Lifted Into the Air Using a Cluster of Balloons [Gallery]

The National Geographic Channel has a new show premiering this fall called “How Hard Can it Be?” and in one episode the project will be to lift a house using balloons like in the animated movie “Up”.

There are many things people want to recreate from movies to see if they’re possible and what the experience would be like if they were real. One of those would be the flying house from Disney/Pixar’s Oscar-winning film “Up”. Some engineers and an army of volunteers proved that movie magic can happen in real life.

We couldn’t believe our eyes when we saw these images of a real-life version of the balloon-lofted house from the Pixar animated film UP this morning. The house was launched from an air field east of LA by the National Geographic Channel to break the world record for the largest flight of balloons in a cluster.

The National Geographic Channel has a new show premiering this fall called “How Hard Can it Be?” and in one episode the project will be to lift a house using balloons like in the animated movie “Up”. The producers didn’t build an actual working house, but really just a shell of a house that measured 16-feet wide x 18-feet tall.

The crew went to a private airfield just outside of Los Angeles to perform the experiment, constructing the house and outfitting it with 300 8-feet tall colored weather balloons. Each balloon took an entire helium tank to fill up.

On March 5th the tiny house was lifted into the air and reached more than 10,000 feet, staying up in the air for about an hour. The show won’t air until this fall, but the cameras of ABC’s Good Morning America were there to capture the event.

It’s pretty amazing they actually got a house to float and stay up there for that long. Kids, please, don’t try this at (or in this case, with) your home. [via Inhabitat and My Modern Met]

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