Bioluminescent Lakes in Australia Glow Blue in The Dark [Gallery]

Photographer Phil Hart, 34, snapped the bizarre sight as his friends emerged from a lake in the dark of night. The spooky light is created by a chemical reaction called “bioluminescence”, which happens when tiny organisms in the water are disturbed.

  • He continued: "Nobody can remember a time when the bioluminescence was as bright as it was on this occasion. The sequence of bushfires and floods which brought such high levels of nutrients into the lakes for these organisms to feed on may not happen again in my lifetime. I feel very fortunate to have been there to see it and to have had my camera gear there to record it." Photo: Phil HartHe continued: "Nobody can remember a time when the bioluminescence was as bright as it was on this occasion. The sequence of bushfires and floods which brought such high levels of nutrients into the lakes for these organisms to feed on may not happen again in my lifetime. I feel very fortunate to have been there to see it and to have had my camera gear there to record it." Photo: Phil Hart
  • These swimmers look like they have been playing with radioactive paint as they glow a fluorescent shade of blue. Photographer Phil Hart snapped the sight as his friends emerged from Gippsland Lakes in Victoria, Australia at night. Photo: Phil HartThese swimmers look like they have been playing with radioactive paint as they glow a fluorescent shade of blue. Photographer Phil Hart snapped the sight as his friends emerged from Gippsland Lakes in Victoria, Australia at night. Photo: Phil Hart
  • These swimmers look like they have been playing with radioactive paint as they glow a fluorescent shade of blue. Photographer Phil Hart snapped the sight as his friends emerged from Gippsland Lakes in Victoria, Australia at night. Photo: Phil HartThese swimmers look like they have been playing with radioactive paint as they glow a fluorescent shade of blue. Photographer Phil Hart snapped the sight as his friends emerged from Gippsland Lakes in Victoria, Australia at night. Photo: Phil Hart
  • Phil said: "The photography was highly addictive and I spent many late nights waiting for the moon to set, capturing as many images as I could, trying different lenses and exposures. I spent one memorable evening trying to photograph the luminescence in gentle waves lapping at Cooinda’s front beach. I kept bringing the camera closer to the water to get the best result." Photo: Phil HartPhil said: "The photography was highly addictive and I spent many late nights waiting for the moon to set, capturing as many images as I could, trying different lenses and exposures. I spent one memorable evening trying to photograph the luminescence in gentle waves lapping at Cooinda’s front beach. I kept bringing the camera closer to the water to get the best result." Photo: Phil Hart
  • Phil, 34, from Melbourne, Australia, added: "While the luminescence was obvious to the eye, the bright blue colour is only apparent in photos with the camera. When the first photo I took appeared on screen I could hardly believe it - the people in the water looked freakish. It was like we were playing with radioactive paint. We stayed up late on several nights and never got tired of playing in the water and taking photos." Photo: Phil HartPhil, 34, from Melbourne, Australia, added: "While the luminescence was obvious to the eye, the bright blue colour is only apparent in photos with the camera. When the first photo I took appeared on screen I could hardly believe it - the people in the water looked freakish. It was like we were playing with radioactive paint. We stayed up late on several nights and never got tired of playing in the water and taking photos." Photo: Phil Hart
  • These images are particularly stunning because the huge amount of the micro-organism "Noctiluca Scintillans" in Gippsland Lakes in Victoria, Australia. Phil said: "To be there watching this bioluminescence is spellbinding and to see it like this is very rare. I am a program director with an organisation that has been running canoeing camps on the Gippsland Lakes for fifty years." Photo: Phil HartThese images are particularly stunning because the huge amount of the micro-organism "Noctiluca Scintillans" in Gippsland Lakes in Victoria, Australia. Phil said: "To be there watching this bioluminescence is spellbinding and to see it like this is very rare. I am a program director with an organisation that has been running canoeing camps on the Gippsland Lakes for fifty years." Photo: Phil Hart

Photographer Phil Hart, 34, snapped the bizarre sight as his friends emerged from a lake in the dark of night. The spooky light is created by a chemical reaction called “bioluminescence”, which happens when tiny organisms in the water are disturbed.

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