Best Wallpapers of 2010 by National Geographic

NEW YORK | Tuesday, January 11th, 2011 12:06pm EDT

Desktop backgrounds gives your computer a special elegance that can breaks the barrier of boredom of your PC , so in this topic we will see a group of special backgrounds from National Geographic.

  • Serra da Leba, Angola: This is Serra da Leba, a landmark in Angola. It has been one of the country's postcard images for decades, but all shots were taken by day. I needed something different. I decided to try a night shot, but it seemed impossible: pitch black, foggy, an altitude of 1,800 meters (5,000 feet). My Nikon can stay open as long as 60 seconds max. But a car takes a few minutes to climb and descend and complete the "drawing." The fog was blocking! Suddenly the fog cleared, a car went down, another went up, and they met in the middle in under 60 seconds. Painting done. Photograph by Kostadin LuchanskySerra da Leba, Angola: This is Serra da Leba, a landmark in Angola. It has been one of the country's postcard images for decades, but all shots were taken by day. I needed something different. I decided to try a night shot, but it seemed impossible: pitch black, foggy, an altitude of 1,800 meters (5,000 feet). My Nikon can stay open as long as 60 seconds max. But a car takes a few minutes to climb and descend and complete the "drawing." The fog was blocking! Suddenly the fog cleared, a car went down, another went up, and they met in the middle in under 60 seconds. Painting done. Photograph by Kostadin Luchansky
  • Waikawau Bay, New Zealand: This photo was taken at Waikawau Bay, Coromandel, New Zealand. After a gorgeous drive up the coast I was greeted with this scene. It kind of reminds me of the symmetrical paintings I did at primary school where you painted one side then folded the paper in half. The weather always seems to provide unique opportunities up this end of New Zealand. Photograph by Steve BurlingWaikawau Bay, New Zealand: This photo was taken at Waikawau Bay, Coromandel, New Zealand. After a gorgeous drive up the coast I was greeted with this scene. It kind of reminds me of the symmetrical paintings I did at primary school where you painted one side then folded the paper in half. The weather always seems to provide unique opportunities up this end of New Zealand. Photograph by Steve Burling
  • View From the Top of the World: Not many people have had the opportunity to look down on the peaks of the Himalaya, but this 1963 picture from photographer Barry Bishop gave proof that Americans had finally reached the summit of Mount Everest. Bishop's teammates became the first Americans to summit Everest on May 1, 1963. Photograph by Barry C. BishopView From the Top of the World: Not many people have had the opportunity to look down on the peaks of the Himalaya, but this 1963 picture from photographer Barry Bishop gave proof that Americans had finally reached the summit of Mount Everest. Bishop's teammates became the first Americans to summit Everest on May 1, 1963. Photograph by Barry C. Bishop
  • Sei Whale Skull, Chile: Inland ice fields give way along Chile's coast to a maze of islands and fjords. The weather here is rarely calm. On Byron Island, the skull of a sei whale rests in a tidal creek—until the next storm. Photograph by Maria StenzelSei Whale Skull, Chile: Inland ice fields give way along Chile's coast to a maze of islands and fjords. The weather here is rarely calm. On Byron Island, the skull of a sei whale rests in a tidal creek—until the next storm. Photograph by Maria Stenzel
  • Fallen Maple Leaf: A solitary red maple leaf lies on the trunk of a downed tree in Maine's Acadia National Park. The United States is home to some 90 different species of maple trees. Photograph by Raul TouzonFallen Maple Leaf: A solitary red maple leaf lies on the trunk of a downed tree in Maine's Acadia National Park. The United States is home to some 90 different species of maple trees. Photograph by Raul Touzon
  • Lavender Fields: Purple tints land and sky as night falls over lavender fields at Tasmania's famed Bridestowe Estate. The plantation is one of the largest lavender farms in the world. Photograph by Gerd LudwigLavender Fields: Purple tints land and sky as night falls over lavender fields at Tasmania's famed Bridestowe Estate. The plantation is one of the largest lavender farms in the world. Photograph by Gerd Ludwig
  • Puffin, Shiant Islands: Dapper black-and-white razorbills (at right) and bright-beaked puffins (at left and in air, at center) find a haven on the Shiant Islands, just a few miles southeast of Lewis, Scotland. Nearly 8,000 razorbills and more than 200,000 puffins are estimated to use these islands as their breeding grounds each year. Photograph by Jim Richardson, National GeographicPuffin, Shiant Islands: Dapper black-and-white razorbills (at right) and bright-beaked puffins (at left and in air, at center) find a haven on the Shiant Islands, just a few miles southeast of Lewis, Scotland. Nearly 8,000 razorbills and more than 200,000 puffins are estimated to use these islands as their breeding grounds each year. Photograph by Jim Richardson, National Geographic
  • Matanuska Glacier Cave, Alaska: Meltwater sculpted the dagger-like shaft of ice near a cave in Matanuska Glacier in Alaska's Chugach Mountains. Matanuska is an active glacier, advancing about one foot (0.3 meters) every day. Photograph by George F. MobleyMatanuska Glacier Cave, Alaska: Meltwater sculpted the dagger-like shaft of ice near a cave in Matanuska Glacier in Alaska's Chugach Mountains. Matanuska is an active glacier, advancing about one foot (0.3 meters) every day. Photograph by George F. Mobley
  • Manarola, Italy: A scene of the tiny village of Manarola on the Cinque Terre coast of Italy. I camped on this spot for some time waiting for the right balance of light as the sun set. I was rewarded with many great shots of the late afternoon and even in moonlight. This long exposure captures the essence of the village with the locals all joining for a party near the boat ramp. Photograph by Paul HogieManarola, Italy: A scene of the tiny village of Manarola on the Cinque Terre coast of Italy. I camped on this spot for some time waiting for the right balance of light as the sun set. I was rewarded with many great shots of the late afternoon and even in moonlight. This long exposure captures the essence of the village with the locals all joining for a party near the boat ramp. Photograph by Paul Hogie
  • Lion, South Africa: This South African lion looks a bit grouchy, but he was actually yawning. His yawning caused a chain reaction of yawns from every member of the pride. Are you yawning yet? Photograph by Barbara MotterLion, South Africa: This South African lion looks a bit grouchy, but he was actually yawning. His yawning caused a chain reaction of yawns from every member of the pride. Are you yawning yet? Photograph by Barbara Motter
  • Lakeside Reflection: A still lake reflects sky and trees in Canada. Photograph by Raymond GehmanLakeside Reflection: A still lake reflects sky and trees in Canada. Photograph by Raymond Gehman
  • Hand of Fatima, Mali: Silhouetted by the sun, the Hand of Fatima rock formations near Hombori village stretch toward the sky in Mali. The tallest tower rises 2,000 feet (610 meters) from the desert floor. Lore has it that the formations' name stems from the five towers' resemblance to a hand from the sky. Photograph by Jimmy ChinHand of Fatima, Mali: Silhouetted by the sun, the Hand of Fatima rock formations near Hombori village stretch toward the sky in Mali. The tallest tower rises 2,000 feet (610 meters) from the desert floor. Lore has it that the formations' name stems from the five towers' resemblance to a hand from the sky. Photograph by Jimmy Chin
  • Great White Egrets: A trio of great white egrets alights on a tree against darkening skies in Gabon’s Petit-Loango Reserve. These long-legged, S-necked birds live near water, where they feed on fish, reptiles, and small amphibians, which they snare with a quick thrust of their strong bill before swallowing them whole. Photograph by Michael NicholsGreat White Egrets: A trio of great white egrets alights on a tree against darkening skies in Gabon’s Petit-Loango Reserve. These long-legged, S-necked birds live near water, where they feed on fish, reptiles, and small amphibians, which they snare with a quick thrust of their strong bill before swallowing them whole. Photograph by Michael Nichols
  • Sand Dunes, Rub al Khali: The borders of four nations—Saudi Arabia, Oman, Yemen, and the United Arab Emirates—blur beneath the shifting sands of the Rub al Khali, or Empty Quarter, desert. Photograph by George SteinmetzSand Dunes, Rub al Khali: The borders of four nations—Saudi Arabia, Oman, Yemen, and the United Arab Emirates—blur beneath the shifting sands of the Rub al Khali, or Empty Quarter, desert. Photograph by George Steinmetz
  • Denali Highway, Alaska: A rainbow stretches over a section of the 670-mile-long (1,100-kilometer-long) Denali Highway in Alaska. Rainbows are a simple, ordered display of visible light reflected off of water droplets in the atmosphere. Photograph by Rich ReidDenali Highway, Alaska: A rainbow stretches over a section of the 670-mile-long (1,100-kilometer-long) Denali Highway in Alaska. Rainbows are a simple, ordered display of visible light reflected off of water droplets in the atmosphere. Photograph by Rich Reid
  • Cherry Trees and Walkway, Japan: This picture was taken in Iwakuni, Japan at the Kintai Bridge. The Cherry Blossom (Sakura) festival had just ended and that is when I decided to go and get some good pictures. Photograph by Thomas SimonsonCherry Trees and Walkway, Japan: This picture was taken in Iwakuni, Japan at the Kintai Bridge. The Cherry Blossom (Sakura) festival had just ended and that is when I decided to go and get some good pictures. Photograph by Thomas Simonson
  • Bering Sea Sunset: Water from the Bering Sea crashes on the rocks of Margaret Bay in Dutch Harbor, Alaska. This photo and caption were submitted to My Shot. Create and share albums, puzzles, and games with your photos in our My Shot community. Photograph by Christopher Zimmer, My ShotBering Sea Sunset: Water from the Bering Sea crashes on the rocks of Margaret Bay in Dutch Harbor, Alaska. This photo and caption were submitted to My Shot. Create and share albums, puzzles, and games with your photos in our My Shot community. Photograph by Christopher Zimmer, My Shot
  • Bathing Parrot: During a boat trip across the Gulf of Papagayo, this nice parrot decided that he couldn't stand the heat of the Guanacaste summer and decided to take a bath. Photograph by Cesar BadillaBathing Parrot: During a boat trip across the Gulf of Papagayo, this nice parrot decided that he couldn't stand the heat of the Guanacaste summer and decided to take a bath. Photograph by Cesar Badilla
  • Castor Bean Leaf Close-Up: Veins spider across a castor bean leaf in Hungary. Photograph by Jozsef SzentpeteriCastor Bean Leaf Close-Up: Veins spider across a castor bean leaf in Hungary. Photograph by Jozsef Szentpeteri
  • Eyelash Viper: Eyelash vipers are indigenous to Central and South America and come in a variety of colors, including shocking yellow, like this specimen. Photograph by George GrallEyelash Viper: Eyelash vipers are indigenous to Central and South America and come in a variety of colors, including shocking yellow, like this specimen. Photograph by George Grall

Desktop backgrounds gives your computer a special elegance that can breaks the barrier of boredom of your PC , so in this topic we will see a group of special backgrounds from National Geographic. Differentially of any backgrounds that you have seen in any other place, National Geographic always gives us breathtaking photos that appears the beauty of the planet in which we live , so let’s enjoy this photo set. However, don’t forget to tell us in the comments below, which is your favourite background is this group?

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