Google Launches Chrome OS Pilot Program With 3G Laptops

Google Inc. has announced a new operating system, Chrome OS, that will pit the search giant against Microsoft, Apple and Linux.

Screenshot of Google Chrome OS showing the application menu. Photo: Google via TheBlogIsMine/Flickr

In recent years, users have had three major operating systems to choose from: Microsoft’s Windows, Apple’s Mac OS, and Linux. Today, at a media event in San Francisco, Google Inc. introduced the fourth option, Google Chrome OS.

‘With Chrome OS, we have the development of a viable third choice for the desktop,” said CEO Eric Schmidt, evidently unconvinced that Linux counts where consumers are concerned.

Google Inc. announced a pilot program for Chrome OS, its highly anticipated browser-based operating system, launched the Chrome Web Store, its effort to change the way Web apps are discovered and purchased, and provided an update on the global adoption of its Chrome browser.

“Last year, we announced our effort to design an operating system that is built and optimized for the web. Many people already spend all their time in a web browser, and by building an operating system that is essentially a browser, we can make computers faster, much simpler and fundamentally more secure,” wrote Google at company’s blog.

Chrome OS won’t be ready for a stable release until mid-2011. That’s when Google’s Chrome OS hardware partners Acer and Samsung are expected to ship their Chrome OS netbooks. But this week the company plans to begin shipping specially commissioned hardware to select testers through its Chrome OS pilot program.

“We’re not done yet, but Chrome OS is at the stage where we need feedback from real users. Some of the features of Chrome OS require new hardware, but we didn’t want to sell pre-beta computers. Instead we’re launching a pilot program where we will give test notebooks to qualified users, developers, schools and businesses,” wrote Linus Upson, VP Engineering, at company’s blog.

Program participants will receive a Google netbook, designated Cr-48, with Chrome OS installed. The Cr-48 laptop has a nice 10 second boot time, 8 hours of battery life, 8 days standby, 12-inch LCD display, and weighs about 3.8 pounds.

The company extended invitations to event attendees, to a random group of users through an invitation placed on the Chrome new tab page, and to some Facebook users who participated in a recent quiz. If you’re really digging the look of Chrome OS, you can sign up for the Google’s U.S. pilot program here, or get more details at their minisite.

“Chrome notebooks are designed to reach the web instantly, are easy to share among friends and family, and simply by logging in, all of your apps, bookmarks and other browser settings are there. Setting up a new machine takes less than a minute. And even at this early stage, we feel there is no consumer or business operating system that is more secure,” said Sundar Pichai, VP of product management at company’s blog.

Chrome Web Store is open for business now. Developers have already started uploading apps, and we expect the number to grow over time. Right now the store is only available in the U.S., but will expand to many countries and currencies early next year. Photo: Google via TheBlogIsMine/Flickr

Google is throwing out the things people hate most about computers – slow startup times, the need to update and install software, and security worries – and offering an operating system that loads its Chrome browser instead of a desktop file system.

Those using Chrome OS will have to rely on Web applications in place of familiar favorites like Microsoft Office. To ensure an adequate supply of Web apps, Google launched its Chrome Web Store, an online app store that aims to do for Web apps what Apple’s iTunes has done for music and iOS apps: build a viable market by providing a mechanism for discovery and monetization.

The Chrome Web Store has some 500 apps at launch but Google expects that developers will add many more in the months ahead. Several companies sent representatives to discuss the Web apps they’ve created for Chrome, including Amazon, Electronic Arts, and the New York Times.

Amazon showcased an e-commerce Web app called Amazon Windowshop and Kindle for the Web, which will be available early next year. Electronic Arts demonstrated a game called Popit that will ship with future versions of Chrome. And the New York Times showed off a newspaper reading Web app that allows the user to control how news gets presented.

Pichai acknowledged that offline functionality was necessary and demonstrated a version of Google Docs that works offline (coming early next year). But he said that the Web is better when a network connection is available. That’s why Google has partnered with Verizon to offer on-demand cellular connectivity with every Chrome notebook.

The Verizon plan provides for 100 MB of free data every month for two years. It doesn’t require a contract and additional data can be purchased as needed, starting at $9.99 for unlimited data for one day. Pichai also provided an update on the adoption of its Google Chrome browser. Chrome had 70 million users in May. Now it has 120 million users worldwide.

“In the first half of next year Chrome notebooks will be available for sale from Acer and Samsung. More manufacturers will follow. Also, Chrome OS is designed to work across a wide range of screen sizes and form factors, enabling our partners to deliver computing devices beyond notebooks,” said Sundar Pichai, VP of product management.[via The Telegraph (UK), IntoMobile and Mashable]

Share this article

We welcome comments that advance the story directly or with relevant tangential information. We try to block comments that use offensive language, all capital letters or appear to be spam, and we review comments frequently to ensure they meet our standards. If you see a comment that you believe is irrelevant or inappropriate, you can flag it to our editors by using the report abuse links. Views expressed in the comments do not represent those of Coinspeaker Ltd.