Mind-blowing Macro Photographs of Insects and Spiders by John Hallmen

The amateur bug photographer John Hallmén photographs the insects and spiders he finds in the Nackareservatet nature reserve, near his home in Stockholm, Sweden, magnifying his subjects to present them in intricate details.

  • A male anthomyiid fly on dry grass covered in frost. Photo: John Hallmen/FlickrA male anthomyiid fly on dry grass covered in frost. Photo: John Hallmen/Flickr
  • A 5mm-long jumping spider. Photo: John Hallmen/FlickrA 5mm-long jumping spider. Photo: John Hallmen/Flickr
  • Studio image of a small yellow ant, a species which rarely leaves its nest. Photo: John Hallmen/FlickrStudio image of a small yellow ant, a species which rarely leaves its nest. Photo: John Hallmen/Flickr
  • A puss moth caterpillar. Photo: John Hallmen/FlickrA puss moth caterpillar. Photo: John Hallmen/Flickr
  • For field shots John rises before sunrise to hunt for slumbering critters concealed in the foliage. "Sometimes you'll find them covered in dew that forms in small, spherical droplets," he said. "This can turn a tiny, inconspicuous insect into a shimmering jewel." Studio image of a horse fly. Photo: John Hallmen/FlickrFor field shots John rises before sunrise to hunt for slumbering critters concealed in the foliage. "Sometimes you'll find them covered in dew that forms in small, spherical droplets," he said. "This can turn a tiny, inconspicuous insect into a shimmering jewel." Studio image of a horse fly. Photo: John Hallmen/Flickr
  • A newly awake jewel wasp on a Sedum plant. Photo: John Hallmen/FlickrA newly awake jewel wasp on a Sedum plant. Photo: John Hallmen/Flickr
  • "I was hoping it would stay asleep until the sun hit the patch of dry grass in the background, turning it from a drab, dark grey into a nice gradient. When it did I had only a couple of minutes before the sun hit the bee and woke it up." Studio image of an 8mm-long hoverfly with an unusually pronounced snout. Photo: John Hallmen/Flickr"I was hoping it would stay asleep until the sun hit the patch of dry grass in the background, turning it from a drab, dark grey into a nice gradient. When it did I had only a couple of minutes before the sun hit the bee and woke it up." Studio image of an 8mm-long hoverfly with an unusually pronounced snout. Photo: John Hallmen/Flickr
  • For studio shots John uses dead bugs that he collects from nature or harvests when they happen to come near him. "I've found that a completely random approach often pays off," said John who works as a freelance graphic designer. "For example the Nomada bee landed in my coffee cup when I was having a family picnic." In this photo a studio image of a horse fly. Photo: John Hallmen/FlickrFor studio shots John uses dead bugs that he collects from nature or harvests when they happen to come near him. "I've found that a completely random approach often pays off," said John who works as a freelance graphic designer. "For example the Nomada bee landed in my coffee cup when I was having a family picnic." In this photo a studio image of a horse fly. Photo: John Hallmen/Flickr
  • Sometimes it takes hours to achieve the desired lighting for his pictures. "With the sleeping Megachilid bee I anxiously watched it for an hour," he said. In this photo a studio image of a large ant. Photo: John Hallmen/FlickrSometimes it takes hours to achieve the desired lighting for his pictures. "With the sleeping Megachilid bee I anxiously watched it for an hour," he said. In this photo a studio image of a large ant. Photo: John Hallmen/Flickr
  • A feeding hoverfly. Photo: John Hallmen/FlickrA feeding hoverfly. Photo: John Hallmen/Flickr
  • A 7mm-long megachild bee locks its mandibles around a stalk to stay put during the night. Photo: John Hallmen/FlickrA 7mm-long megachild bee locks its mandibles around a stalk to stay put during the night. Photo: John Hallmen/Flickr
  • Using a mixture of studio and alfresco shots John magnifies the insects to show the beautiful colour and detail of his subjects. A male blue damselfly straddling the gap between two dry grass reeds. Photo: John Hallmen/FlickrUsing a mixture of studio and alfresco shots John magnifies the insects to show the beautiful colour and detail of his subjects. A male blue damselfly straddling the gap between two dry grass reeds. Photo: John Hallmen/Flickr
  • Amateur bug photographer John Hallmén has been fascinated by insects and spiders since childhood. In the last three years he's made a name for himself by photographing the tiny creatures he finds in the Nackareservatet nature reserve near his home in Stockholm, Sweden. Here's a black ant (Lasius niger). Photo: John Hallmen/FlickrAmateur bug photographer John Hallmén has been fascinated by insects and spiders since childhood. In the last three years he's made a name for himself by photographing the tiny creatures he finds in the Nackareservatet nature reserve near his home in Stockholm, Sweden. Here's a black ant (Lasius niger). Photo: John Hallmen/Flickr

The amateur bug photographer John Hallmén photographs the insects and spiders he finds in the Nackareservatet nature reserve, near his home in Stockholm, Sweden, magnifying his subjects to present them in intricate details.

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