Postcards From The Future: London After Climate Change

Robert Graves and Didier Madoc-Jones in their work called “Postcards From The Future” display the full impact of global warming, food scarcity, rising sea levels on London and how all Londoners will need to innovate and adapt to survive.

  • London's busiest thoroughfare is a haven of calm as water levels rise ever higher. Water lilies, fish and wind turbines fight a losing battle on behalf of a civilisation which is going, going, gone. What happens to busy city centres once they become redundant? Piccadilly Circus is synonymous with being busy but could become a haven of calm and peace with empty buildings just used for supporting the infrastructure of power generation. Picture: Robert Graves and Didier Madoc-Jones / PostcardsFromTheFuture.co.ukLondon's busiest thoroughfare is a haven of calm as water levels rise ever higher. Water lilies, fish and wind turbines fight a losing battle on behalf of a civilisation which is going, going, gone. What happens to busy city centres once they become redundant? Piccadilly Circus is synonymous with being busy but could become a haven of calm and peace with empty buildings just used for supporting the infrastructure of power generation. Picture: Robert Graves and Didier Madoc-Jones / PostcardsFromTheFuture.co.uk
  • Where once gargoyles would sit on the walls of venerated buildings, St Paul's Cathedral is now host to a new breed of tropical immigrants, enjoying the view of the flooded Thames and reminiscing about equatorial days. And, despite the warning, feeding on some of the capital's newly fashionable staple foods. Our apes are totally relaxed, perched in what is to us a narrow and precarious environment. They are truly at home. Picture: Robert Graves and Didier Madoc-Jones / PostcardsFromTheFuture.co.ukWhere once gargoyles would sit on the walls of venerated buildings, St Paul's Cathedral is now host to a new breed of tropical immigrants, enjoying the view of the flooded Thames and reminiscing about equatorial days. And, despite the warning, feeding on some of the capital's newly fashionable staple foods. Our apes are totally relaxed, perched in what is to us a narrow and precarious environment. They are truly at home. Picture: Robert Graves and Didier Madoc-Jones / PostcardsFromTheFuture.co.uk
  • The river remains a focus of power generation, just as it was for the great coal-powered power stations of old. Around the old Thames Barrier a number of new tidal power stations are using the tidal flows up and down the Thames to generate electricity for thousands of London businesses and homes. Picture: Robert Graves and Didier Madoc-Jones / PostcardsFromTheFuture.co.ukThe river remains a focus of power generation, just as it was for the great coal-powered power stations of old. Around the old Thames Barrier a number of new tidal power stations are using the tidal flows up and down the Thames to generate electricity for thousands of London businesses and homes. Picture: Robert Graves and Didier Madoc-Jones / PostcardsFromTheFuture.co.uk
  • As the Gulf Stream slows a mini ice-age brings temporary relief to heat-weary Londoners. Winter skating becomes London's most popular sport and Tower Bridge is a favourite spot. The scene harks back to the 17th century when artists loved to paint London's Frost Fairs. Then, the Thames froze over because the river flowed sluggishly. Now, the river flows quickly but every winter the temperature falls to new lows. Picture: Robert Graves and Didier Madoc-Jones / PostcardsFromTheFuture.co.ukAs the Gulf Stream slows a mini ice-age brings temporary relief to heat-weary Londoners. Winter skating becomes London's most popular sport and Tower Bridge is a favourite spot. The scene harks back to the 17th century when artists loved to paint London's Frost Fairs. Then, the Thames froze over because the river flowed sluggishly. Now, the river flows quickly but every winter the temperature falls to new lows. Picture: Robert Graves and Didier Madoc-Jones / PostcardsFromTheFuture.co.uk
  • Nelson looks down on a shanty town of climate refugees. As the equatorial belt becomes uninhabitable, so people are driven north in search of food and security. People settle wherever they can and many reach London. This is the political dilemma of the day for all European countries. The numbers are overwhelming. London's strategy is to cluster the new arrivals in the historic centre, rather than spread them through the suburbs, where most Londoners now live. Picture: Robert Graves and Didier Madoc-Jones / PostcardsFromTheFuture.co.ukNelson looks down on a shanty town of climate refugees. As the equatorial belt becomes uninhabitable, so people are driven north in search of food and security. People settle wherever they can and many reach London. This is the political dilemma of the day for all European countries. The numbers are overwhelming. London's strategy is to cluster the new arrivals in the historic centre, rather than spread them through the suburbs, where most Londoners now live. Picture: Robert Graves and Didier Madoc-Jones / PostcardsFromTheFuture.co.uk
  • Never mind biblical proportions, this epic storm is of filmic proportions, as real life imitates Hollywood's top tornadoes and onlookers run for their lives. As the UK climate changes more extreme weather conditions become a regular feature of life in the UK. Trafalgar Square is a both a symbol and gathering place for Londoners with Nelson's column, the pigeons, New Year's Eve celebrations, red buses, etc. The artists say: "We took a wider view to capture the scale and energy of the tornado tearing up Whitehall". Picture: Robert Graves and Didier Madoc-Jones / PostcardsFromTheFuture.co.ukNever mind biblical proportions, this epic storm is of filmic proportions, as real life imitates Hollywood's top tornadoes and onlookers run for their lives. As the UK climate changes more extreme weather conditions become a regular feature of life in the UK. Trafalgar Square is a both a symbol and gathering place for Londoners with Nelson's column, the pigeons, New Year's Eve celebrations, red buses, etc. The artists say: "We took a wider view to capture the scale and energy of the tornado tearing up Whitehall". Picture: Robert Graves and Didier Madoc-Jones / PostcardsFromTheFuture.co.uk
  • This view across Parliament Square shows paddy fields running up to the walls of the Palace of Westminster. The land that once housed political protest is now part of the cityís food production effort. In this scenario London has adapted to rising water tables in radical ways. Managed flooding is now the name of the game, as is self-sufficiency in food. Central London is a network of rice paddies - and Londoners' diet is largely rice-based. Picture: Robert Graves and Didier Madoc-Jones / PostcardsFromTheFuture.co.ukThis view across Parliament Square shows paddy fields running up to the walls of the Palace of Westminster. The land that once housed political protest is now part of the cityís food production effort. In this scenario London has adapted to rising water tables in radical ways. Managed flooding is now the name of the game, as is self-sufficiency in food. Central London is a network of rice paddies - and Londoners' diet is largely rice-based. Picture: Robert Graves and Didier Madoc-Jones / PostcardsFromTheFuture.co.uk
  • That archetypical British driveway The Mall is as valid a wind-farming plot as any bleak moor or field. Wind turbines predominate over flags, as the desperate quest for renewable energy takes precedence over any remaining notions of Britishness. Cars? Now what on earth were they? Picture: Robert Graves and Didier Madoc-Jones / PostcardsFromTheFuture.co.ukThat archetypical British driveway The Mall is as valid a wind-farming plot as any bleak moor or field. Wind turbines predominate over flags, as the desperate quest for renewable energy takes precedence over any remaining notions of Britishness. Cars? Now what on earth were they? Picture: Robert Graves and Didier Madoc-Jones / PostcardsFromTheFuture.co.uk
  • London's open spaces start to resemble tropical plantations. With the costs of food production increasing and cultivatable land becoming scarce, more and more parks and green spaces are given over to agriculture. Farming meets industry as palm oil is harvested to meet our changing energy needs. The artists say: "The Hyde Park Hilton is an iconic landmark but looks like a 60s tropical resort hotel. We felt it would work well with the agricultural scene in the foreground." Picture: Robert Graves and Didier Madoc-Jones / PostcardsFromTheFuture.co.ukLondon's open spaces start to resemble tropical plantations. With the costs of food production increasing and cultivatable land becoming scarce, more and more parks and green spaces are given over to agriculture. Farming meets industry as palm oil is harvested to meet our changing energy needs. The artists say: "The Hyde Park Hilton is an iconic landmark but looks like a 60s tropical resort hotel. We felt it would work well with the agricultural scene in the foreground." Picture: Robert Graves and Didier Madoc-Jones / PostcardsFromTheFuture.co.uk
  • The sunset over Kew Gardens catches London's brand new nuclear power station on the banks of the Thames. Nuclear power is now widely accepted as the only viable alternative to fossil fuels. Expert opinion confirms that new power stations are best located near the populations they serve and architects strive to create new 'harmonious' landmarks. This is nothing new for London, which has a tradition of siting its power stations in its middle: Battersea, for example. Picture: Robert Graves and Didier Madoc-Jones / PostcardsFromTheFuture.co.ukThe sunset over Kew Gardens catches London's brand new nuclear power station on the banks of the Thames. Nuclear power is now widely accepted as the only viable alternative to fossil fuels. Expert opinion confirms that new power stations are best located near the populations they serve and architects strive to create new 'harmonious' landmarks. This is nothing new for London, which has a tradition of siting its power stations in its middle: Battersea, for example. Picture: Robert Graves and Didier Madoc-Jones / PostcardsFromTheFuture.co.uk
  • Traditional rituals have altered beyond recognition, along with the climate. Here, on Horse Guards Parade, horses have been replaced by camels - animals that can withstand the heat of the parade ground. The change was controversial but the London Tourist Board argued strongly in favour. Tourism remains important for London's economy. Picture: Robert Graves and Didier Madoc-Jones / PostcardsFromTheFuture.co.ukTraditional rituals have altered beyond recognition, along with the climate. Here, on Horse Guards Parade, horses have been replaced by camels - animals that can withstand the heat of the parade ground. The change was controversial but the London Tourist Board argued strongly in favour. Tourism remains important for London's economy. Picture: Robert Graves and Didier Madoc-Jones / PostcardsFromTheFuture.co.uk
  • The Gherkin is now high-rise housing. Originally converted into luxury flats, the block soon slid down the social scale to become a high-density, multi-occupation tower block. The Gherkin now worries the authorities as a potential slum. Refugees from equatorial lands have moved north in search of food. They make their homes in the buildings that once drove world finance - before the collapse of the global economy. Picture: Robert Graves and Didier Madoc-Jones / PostcardsFromTheFuture.co.ukThe Gherkin is now high-rise housing. Originally converted into luxury flats, the block soon slid down the social scale to become a high-density, multi-occupation tower block. The Gherkin now worries the authorities as a potential slum. Refugees from equatorial lands have moved north in search of food. They make their homes in the buildings that once drove world finance - before the collapse of the global economy. Picture: Robert Graves and Didier Madoc-Jones / PostcardsFromTheFuture.co.uk
  • London becomes the new Venice. But where the city of the gondola has made an accommodation with the water it sits in, London has become uninhabitable, as every year the Thames Barrier is overwhelmed by spring tides. This image was created by flooding the GMJ London CityModel to 6 metres which is the flood level required to breach the Thames Barrier. The photography was then applied to the digital model and the image was rendered and painted to capture the reflections and light in the water. Picture: Robert Graves and Didier Madoc-Jones / PostcardsFromTheFuture.co.ukLondon becomes the new Venice. But where the city of the gondola has made an accommodation with the water it sits in, London has become uninhabitable, as every year the Thames Barrier is overwhelmed by spring tides. This image was created by flooding the GMJ London CityModel to 6 metres which is the flood level required to breach the Thames Barrier. The photography was then applied to the digital model and the image was rendered and painted to capture the reflections and light in the water. Picture: Robert Graves and Didier Madoc-Jones / PostcardsFromTheFuture.co.uk
  • The climate refugee crisis reaches epic proportions. The vast shanty town that stretches across London?s centre leaves historic buildings marooned, including Buckingham Palace. The Royal family is surrounded in their London home. Everybody is on the move and the flooded city centre is now uninhabitable and empty ? apart from the thousands of shanty-dwellers. But should empty buildings and land be opened up to climate refugees? Picture: Robert Graves and Didier Madoc-Jones / PostcardsFromTheFuture.co.ukThe climate refugee crisis reaches epic proportions. The vast shanty town that stretches across London?s centre leaves historic buildings marooned, including Buckingham Palace. The Royal family is surrounded in their London home. Everybody is on the move and the flooded city centre is now uninhabitable and empty ? apart from the thousands of shanty-dwellers. But should empty buildings and land be opened up to climate refugees? Picture: Robert Graves and Didier Madoc-Jones / PostcardsFromTheFuture.co.uk
  • That mainstay of the British summer (along with Wimbledon, barbecues and grim Bank Holidays), the Notting Hill Carnival is still going strong. But with a difference. Being out in the sun is now high-risk. Everyone is provided with standard issue sun-block to protect every inch of exposed skin. Health and safety gone mad, or gone sensible? The artists say: "The photography was taken at the 2008 Notting Hill Carnival. Into it we've modelled, rendered and painted a series of sun-block dispensers and then painted everybody blue." Picture: Robert Graves and Didier Madoc-Jones / PostcardsFromTheFuture.co.ukThat mainstay of the British summer (along with Wimbledon, barbecues and grim Bank Holidays), the Notting Hill Carnival is still going strong. But with a difference. Being out in the sun is now high-risk. Everyone is provided with standard issue sun-block to protect every inch of exposed skin. Health and safety gone mad, or gone sensible? The artists say: "The photography was taken at the 2008 Notting Hill Carnival. Into it we've modelled, rendered and painted a series of sun-block dispensers and then painted everybody blue." Picture: Robert Graves and Didier Madoc-Jones / PostcardsFromTheFuture.co.uk

Robert Graves and Didier Madoc-Jones in their work called “Postcards From The Future” display the full impact of global warming, food scarcity, rising sea levels on London and how all Londoners will need to innovate and adapt to survive.

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