Australian Women Set New World Record For Fastest Stiletto Race

In just over one minute and four seconds, four glamorous girls from Canberra have set a new world record for the fastest relay race in stiletto heels.

Competitors leave the start line during a special group photo shoot, with the Harbour Bridge in the background, at the "Venus Embrace Closest Stiletto Relay" in Sydney on September 28, 2010. An official world record was set at the event for the fastest ever 4 x 100m stiletto relay, which saw women in teams of four running in stilettos with a minimum height of 3 inches, to help raise funds to find a cure for breast cancer. Photo: Hausmann Communications

In just over one minute and four seconds, four glamorous girls from Canberra have set a new world record for the fastest relay race in stiletto heels.

But let’s face it. They were a shoe-in from the start of the race – with all of them being Australian Institute of Sport students.

Organisers say the event attracted more than 100 competitors.

The leggy quartet – Brittney McGlone, Laura Juliff, Casey Hodges and Jessica Penny – smashed the competition at the Venus Embrace Closest Stiletto Race in blazing spring sunshine at Sydney’s Circular Quay today in the shadow of the Opera House.

A competitor (C) laughs as she falls over while completing her leg of a heat in the "Venus Embrace Closest Stiletto Relay" in Sydney on September 28, 2010. An official world record was set at the event for the fastest ever 4 x 100m stiletto relay, which saw women in teams of four running in stilettos with a minimum height of 3 inches, to help raise funds to find a cure for breast cancer. Photo: Hausmann Communications

Ms McGlone romped home first in this event in 2008.

The Pinkettes, as they are collectively known, now plan to head to Phuket, Thailand, and use their $10,000 prize for a well-earned holiday.

Ms McGlone, a hurdling champion, said before the race that the secret to running in heels was to get up on your toes.

“Don’t tell the other girls that!” she whispered before the race.

Competitors pose for a photo on the start line prior to the final of the "Venus Embrace Closest Stiletto Relay" in Sydney on September 28, 2010. An official world record was set at the event for the fastest ever 4 x 100m stiletto relay, which saw women in teams of four running in stilettos with a minimum height of 3 inches, to help raise funds to find a cure for breast cancer. Photo: Hausmann Communications

But that doesn’t mean it was easy for everyone.

Just ask Darren Kelly, the only bloke brave enough to have a go.

After strapping on a pair of size eight heels, with regulation 7.5cm heels, he wobbled down the 80-metre course.
“It’s done for a good cause, to find a cure for cancer,” he gasped afterwards.

Keeping the racers on the move was chief scrutineer and former Miss Australia Erin McNaught, whose job was to check all heels measured at least 7.5cm and that everyone’s legs were smooth.

A competitor runs during a heat of the "Venus Embrace Closest Stiletto Relay" in Sydney on September 28, 2010. An official world record was set at the event for the fastest ever 4 x 100m stiletto relay, which saw women in teams of four running in stilettos with a minimum height of 3 inches, to help raise funds to find a cure for breast cancer. Photo: Hausmann Communications

“Because they’re going for a world record attempt there’s certain conditions which have to be met,” she.

But she turned a blind eye for Mr Kelly on the smooth legs measure.

The Pinkettes were presented with a certificate by record keeper Guinness confirming they had set the world record for the fastest stiletto relay race.

A cheque for $20,000 was presented to the National Breast Cancer Foundation, $1000 of which was raised on the day.

[via World Record Academy and Metro]

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