Colourfully Lit Macro Photos of Insects by Photographer Leon Baas

Dutch photographer Leon Baas has developed his own style of brightly coloured macro photography over the last eight years. He has snapped ants, snails, water beetles, crickets and damselflies – all beautifully lit in his distinctive colourful style.

  • A praying mantis against a dramatic background is pictured by Dutch photographer Leon Baas. Photo: Leon Baas/FlickrA praying mantis against a dramatic background is pictured by Dutch photographer Leon Baas. Photo: Leon Baas/Flickr
  • An ant tries to find its way to dry ground after the rain. The photo is taken by Dutch photographer Leon Baas. Photo: Leon Baas/FlickrAn ant tries to find its way to dry ground after the rain. The photo is taken by Dutch photographer Leon Baas. Photo: Leon Baas/Flickr
  • Sunset: A bug trying to find a way across the flowers. The photo is taken by Dutch photographer Leon Baas. Photo: Leon Baas/FlickrSunset: A bug trying to find a way across the flowers. The photo is taken by Dutch photographer Leon Baas. Photo: Leon Baas/Flickr
  • A reddish-brown European ant, Formica rufa, typically living in anthills in woodlands is pictured here by Dutch photographer Leon Baas. Photo: Leon Baas/FlickrA reddish-brown European ant, Formica rufa, typically living in anthills in woodlands is pictured here by Dutch photographer Leon Baas. Photo: Leon Baas/Flickr
  • Leon says he researches the creatures he hopes to photograph before leaving home so he can try to predict their behaviour and anticipate the best shots. A tiny ant looks towards Leon's camera with one little question: 'What's up?!'. Photo: Leon Baas/FlickrLeon says he researches the creatures he hopes to photograph before leaving home so he can try to predict their behaviour and anticipate the best shots. A tiny ant looks towards Leon's camera with one little question: 'What's up?!'. Photo: Leon Baas/Flickr
  • Leon Baas says about this breathtaking photo: "The shot of the flying or dancing ladybird was a once in a lifetime photograph. I am very happy with it and do not think it will ever happen again." Photo: Leon Baas/FlickrLeon Baas says about this breathtaking photo: "The shot of the flying or dancing ladybird was a once in a lifetime photograph. I am very happy with it and do not think it will ever happen again." Photo: Leon Baas/Flickr
  • The picture shows two spiders, Genus Scytodes, walk down a plant stem. The photo is taken by Dutch photographer Leon Baas. Photo: Leon Baas/FlickrThe picture shows two spiders, Genus Scytodes, walk down a plant stem. The photo is taken by Dutch photographer Leon Baas. Photo: Leon Baas/Flickr
  • Two water beetles. The photo is taken by Dutch photographer Leon Baas. Photo: Leon Baas/FlickrTwo water beetles. The photo is taken by Dutch photographer Leon Baas. Photo: Leon Baas/Flickr
  • A snail trying to find a way across water in Leon's garden. Photo: Leon Baas/FlickrA snail trying to find a way across water in Leon's garden. Photo: Leon Baas/Flickr
  • A ladybird is pictured at the water's edge in this picture taken by Dutch photographer Leon Baas. Photo: Leon Baas/FlickrA ladybird is pictured at the water's edge in this picture taken by Dutch photographer Leon Baas. Photo: Leon Baas/Flickr
  • A ladybird is pictured at the water's edge in this photo taken by Dutch photographer Leon Baas. Photo: Leon Baas/FlickrA ladybird is pictured at the water's edge in this photo taken by Dutch photographer Leon Baas. Photo: Leon Baas/Flickr
  • An ant, Lasius Flavus, is illuminated with a purple glow. Leon Baas says: 'He looks like a guardian from the world of insects.' Photo: Leon Baas/FlickrAn ant, Lasius Flavus, is illuminated with a purple glow. Leon Baas says: 'He looks like a guardian from the world of insects.' Photo: Leon Baas/Flickr

Dutch photographer Leon Baas has developed his own style of brightly coloured macro photography over the last eight years. He has snapped ants, snails, water beetles, crickets and damselflies – all beautifully lit in his distinctive colourful style.

Share This article

We welcome comments that advance the story directly or with relevant tangential information. We try to block comments that use offensive language, all capital letters or appear to be spam, and we review comments frequently to ensure they meet our standards. If you see a comment that you believe is irrelevant or inappropriate, you can flag it to our editors by using the report abuse links. Views expressed in the comments do not represent those of Coinspeaker Ltd.