The Magical Past and Present of Istanbul Through Yekpare Project

Art-directed by Deniz Kader and Candaş Şişman of the firm Nerdworking and soundtracked by Görkem Şen, Yekpare is a project that douses Istanbul’s Haydarpaşa Train Station in the symbological 8,500 year history of the city.

As the art of urban projection has grown, its scope has started blasting out into contexts beyond simply colourful pictures on building. The “Yekpare” Urbanscreening Projection Mapping is one of the most amazing pieces in this format that we’ve seen here at TheBlogIsMine.com.

Art-directed by Deniz Kader and Candaş Şişman of the firm Nerdworking and soundtracked by Görkem Şen, Yekpare is a project that douses Istanbul’s Haydarpaşa Train Station in the symbological 8,500 year history of the city.

Coinciding with the celebrations of the Istanbul European Capital of Culture 2010, Deniz and Candaş, two Turkish visual artists, put all of their passion in order to celebrate their city and its history.

These young talents used the Haydarpaşa Train Station of Istanbul, an emblem of the city, in the new way, not only as a simple screen for their projection but as a vivid element of it. Through constant transformations, Haydarpaşa Train Station becomes a metaphorical map.

According to them, “Yekpare is a storyteller which narrates the 8500 year story of Istanbul. The story embraces symbols from Pagans to Roman Empire, from Byzantine Empire to Latin Empire, and finally from Ottoman Empire to Istanbul at the present day.”

The result is a stunning experience, a never ending wonder to time and form, a pure visual journey to the heart of a city and its millions of stories, blended together in the most surprising way.

They said: “Haydarpaşa Train Station, with its brilliant architectural forms, is the building on which the story is projected. The connection between middle east to west has been provided by Istanbul and Haydarpaşa since 1906.”

“In the 50’s it served as a door for millions of internal emigrants who have triggered the chaos in Istanbul’s dialectical daily life scenes.The project’s conceptual, political and geographical positioning, the location’s depth of field and the fact that the entire show can be watched from Kadıköy coast; make “Yekpare” a dramatic presentation.”


Deniz and Candaş also noticed that “the first day of the performance also marks the 47th deathday of Nazım Hikmet Ran, the famous Turkish poet. We started out with a quote from his epic novel, “Human Landscapes from My Country”: “At Haydarpaşa Train Station, in the spring of 1941, it is three o’clock. Sun, exhaustion and rush lay on the stairs…”

Unfortunately, Yekpare was screened only during three days, but all of you that didn’t have the luck to watch it live can enjoy it through Vimeo. [Nerd Working via Yatzer and Dangerous Minds]

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