Breathtaking Daniel Dancer’s Art Of The Sky Made of Humans

Inspired by the famous Nazca Lines of Peru, these incredible artworks are created using latex paint and lots and lots of people. Environmental artist Daniel Dancer has spent the last ten years travelling the world creating over 100 examples of his Art of the Sky human projects. Using schoolchildren, their parents and teachers to act […]

Photographed from cranes and a hot air balloon, Daniel's work has included stunning bald eagles made up of 1,400 people. Photo: ArtForTheSky.com

Inspired by the famous Nazca Lines of Peru, these incredible artworks are created using latex paint and lots and lots of people.

Environmental artist Daniel Dancer has spent the last ten years travelling the world creating over 100 examples of his Art of the Sky human projects.

Inspired by the Nazca Lines in Peru environmental artist Daniel Dancer has spent the last ten years travelling the world creating over 100 images made out of people and latex paint for his 'Art of the Sky' human projects. This image of Barack Obama from 2008 was made up of 900 people. Photo: ArtForTheSky.com

Using schoolchildren, their parents and teachers to act as the human components, Daniel has recruited thousands of participants.

Photographed from cranes and a hot air balloon, Daniel’s work has included a stunning bald eagle made up of 1,400 people and a Barack Obama from 2008 made up of 900 people.

"At the turn of the century I was inspired by the Kansas field artist Stan Herd and the Peruvian Nazca lines to try to create my own artistry using painting, but most importantly people." Photo: ArtForTheSky.com

‘I have been involved in environmental photography and artistry all my adult life,’ said Oregon resident Daniel, 56.

‘At the turn of the century I was inspired by the Kansas field artist Stan Herd and the Peruvian Nazca lines to try to create my own artistry using painting, but most importantly people.

‘So I gathered 800 or so schoolchildren here in Oregon together and we created a giant salmon on the ground.’

"Everyone knows where they are supposed to be standing and everyone knows that their tops must match the patch of paint that they are standing on. Then everyone gets down on their hands and knees, exposing their backs so that the largest amount of colour is given off." Photo: ArtForTheSky.com

Etching his subject out in the ground using latex paint and tractors to dig up earth, Daniel then co-ordinates his art from above.

‘I ask parents and student council members to help choreograph the events,’ said Daniel.

‘Everyone knows where they are supposed to be standing and everyone knows that their tops must match the patch of paint that they are standing on.

900 students and teachers form a cougar leaping across the sun in 2007 in Des Moines, Iowa. Photo: ArtForTheSky.com

‘Then everyone lies down on their hands and knees and exposes their back so that the largest amount of colour is given off.’

Ascending in a crane to take the pictures, Daniel only does one take, as he does not believe in rehearsals.

‘I have a few principles which my art is supposed to convey,’ explained Daniel.

200 students at Cypress Elementry in Ashland, dress as leaves to become a large tree on their playing area in Ashland, Oregon. Photo: ArtForTheSky.com

‘I want the art to be a collaborative interaction so that the participants understand what they are part of.

‘This could be to feel the plight of the bald eagle or to understand how important Barack Obama is.

‘I hope most of all that people enjoy the visual spectacle.’

Daniel Dancer preparers to go up in a balloon to complete the organisation of an image and photograph it from 100 feet up in the air. Photo: ArtForTheSky.com

Daniel is hoping to bring his work to the UK in the future.

‘I haven’t taken my art to the UK yet, though I have always wanted to do an Art For the Sky response to the crop circles,’ he said. [In Concert With Nature and Art For The Sky via Daily Mail (UK) and Daily Telegraph (UK)]

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