Dance Dance Revolution: 20 Robots Dancing in Perfect Sync

A troupe of dancing robots made its official debut Monday at the ongoing Shanghai 2010 Expo, wowing viewers with synchronized ballet-like movements.

A troupe of dancing robots made its official debut Monday at the ongoing Shanghai 2010 Expo, wowing viewers with synchronized ballet-like movements (see the video below.)

Sure, you’ve seen robots dance before, but you’ve never seen them dancing like this — shimmying, sliding, and sashaying, just like humans, in perfect synchronization. And I mean in sync as in they all do the same thing at the same time, not ‘NSync the talented boy band with all those catchy hits. No, You’re Tearin’ Up My Heart!

A troupe of Nao fully programmable robots developed by a French company are doing an impressive song-and-dance routine at the ongoing Shanghai World Expo. On Monday, which is the France Pavilion Day at the Expo, the robots put on a 10-minute performance to a three-part music compilation.

It’s awesome and a little cute to see the robots move together in sync to the music and the choreography. Priced at about 10,000 Euros each, that’s almost $250,000 worth of dancing robots there.

The Nao robot developed by Aldebaran Robotics weighs about 9.5 lbs and is about 23 inches tall. The robot comes with x86 AMD Geocode 500 Mhz CPU, 2 GB flash memory, two speakers, vision processing capabilities, Wi-fi connectivity and ethernet port. It has 25 degrees of freedom, which means it can do a lot more than just tilt is head, look right, left and take a few steps –which is the ability being showcased with the dancing.

The Nao robots are also playing at Robocup, the annual humanoid robots soccer game, that will be held in Singapore later this week. Hopefully, they will do better than France’s national team at the World Cup. The robots are currently available only to universities though a general release is expected later this year.

Check out this 8-minute long YouTube video below for a look at the robots grooving to the music. [via Wired]

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