World Cup 2010: South Africa Ponders Vuvuzela Ban

FIFA World Cup South Africa organisers are considering a move to ban vuvuzelas, the noisy plastic trumpets that have proved a hit with fans but threaten to deafen players and viewers alike.

An introduction to the vuvuzela, the symbol of soccer in South Africa, which is playing host to the World Cup. Fans are already threatening to play the horns in Brazil in 2014. Photo: Reuters

FIFA 2010 World Cup South Africa organisers are considering a move to ban vuvuzelas, the noisy plastic trumpets that have proved a hit with fans but threaten to deafen players and viewers alike.

Criticism of the vuvuzelas has been almost as loud as the instruments themselves, with broadcasting companies complaining the din is almost drowning out commentary.

Broadcasters and soccer players have been complaining that the constant noise from the vuvuzelas is harming the atmosphere of the games, the BBC reported Sunday.

France captain Patrice Evra said the incessant noise was a factor in his side's poor display in their draw with Uruguay. Photo: Reuters

And South Africa’s World Cup chief Danny Jordaan, when asked if he would get rid of them, told BBC Sport: “We’ve tried to get some order. We have asked for no vuvuzelas during national anthems or during stadium announcements.”

“I know it’s a difficult question (but) we’re trying to manage the best we can. We heard from the broadcasters and individuals, and it’s something we are evaluating on an ongoing base,” organising committee chief Danny Jordaan added.

Jordaan told the BBC in an interview that he had to consider the option of banning the trumpets. “If there are grounds to do so, yes,” he said when asked if a ban was an option.

France captain Patrice Evra has already blamed the noise generated by the vuvuzelas, which has been likened to the drone of thousands of bees, for his side’s poor showing in their opening group game against Uruguay, which finished goalless.

"If there are grounds to do so, yes," organising committee chief Danny Jordaan said when asked if a ban was an option. Photo: Reuters

He said: “We can’t sleep at night because of the vuvuzelas. People start playing them from 6 a.m. We can’t hear one another out on the pitch because of them.”

Portugal star Cristiano Ronaldo added his voice to the complaints about the wall of sound being made by the vuvuzelas, saying the noise disturbs the players’ concentration.

“It is difficult for anyone on the pitch to concentrate,” he said at a press conference. “A lot of players don’t like them, but they are going to have to get used to them.”

“Teams have done nothing but criticise the vuvuzelas, but you have to respect them. Hardly anyone likes them, but the people who do like them are those who like to blow the instruments and make a racket.”

Even lions are playing with the vuvuzela. Photo: Fox Sports

Danny Jordaan, meanwhile, said that he “would prefer singing”, and he called on fans to chant instead of playing their vuvuzelas to create atmosphere.

“It’s always been a great generator of a wonderful atmosphere in stadiums and I would try to encourage them to sing,” Danny said.

“In the days of the struggle (against Apartheid) we were singing, all through our history. “It’s our ability to sing that inspired and drove the emotions,” he added. [via BBC (UK), Fox Sports (Au) and UPI]

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