Drunk Woman Jailed For Calling 911 To Find A Husband

According to the Alliance Police Department’s report, a northeast Ohio woman, Audrey Scott, called 911 for no reason a total of five times, advising dispatchers that she “needs a husband” and was calling about not having electric.

A northeast Ohio woman spent three days in jail for calling the 911 emergency line five times seeking a husband. Photo: Flickr

According to the Alliance Police Department’s report, a northeast Ohio woman, Audrey Scott, called 911 for no reason a total of five times, advising dispatchers that she “needs a husband” and was calling about not having electric.

The dispatcher, familiar with odd calls, was flabbergasted and asked Audrey Scott of Alliance, “You need to get a husband?” The 57-year-old Scott responded, “Yes.” Here’s a full transcript:

Drunk, desperate Audrey: “Get me that husband.”
911 operator: “You need to get a husband?”
Drunk, desperate Audrey: “Yes.”
911 operator: “Do you know you can get arrested for dialing 911?”
Drunk, desperate Audrey: “Let’s do it.”
911 operator: “You want to get arrested for dialing 911?”
Drunk, desperate Audrey: “Absolutely.”

Scott was placed under arrest, transported and booked at the Alliance Police Department and was later transported to the Stark County Jail pending her court date on June 4. Scott was charged with improper use of the 911 system, a fourth degree misdemeanor.

She entered a plea of no contest, and was found guilty. Scott was sentenced to a $250 fine and 10 days in jail. All but three days of her sentence were suspended on condition of good behavior for one year. She was released on June 5.

By Wednesday, the incident was being reported by news networks throughout the country including The Washington Post, CNN and online publication The Huffington Post. A Google search for “911 husband” returned hundreds of news articles and blog posts.

It is unclear how the story made national news, but the city of Alliance Police Department posted the story on its Facebook page at 2:26 p.m. June 4.

“The Alliance Police Department is not a dating service despite one woman’s belief,” the post reads. “Audrey K. Scott called 911 five times yesterday between 4-5 p.m., and what was her emergency … ‘she needed a husband.’ Scott was arrested for misuse of the 911 system. Remember that 911 is for emergencies only! Lives depend on it.”

Alliance Police Chief Scott Griffith said 911 abuse happens “way more than it should,” adding that the department receives at least one “ridiculous 911 call’ a week. He recalled a 911 abuse call when he was a patrol officer in which the caller complained that someone stole pumpkins from their front porch.

“It’s very serious,” Griffith said of 911 abuse. “The police respond in a totally different fashion for a 911 call. We send more officers, the response is prioritized and officers take on a whole different mindset responding to a 911 call. It’s a horrible waste of resources for the police department to respond to calls that come in that aren’t really emergencies.”

As for this particular call receiving so much attention, Griffith wasn’t sure what made it stand out from similar incidents. “It’s probably a little bit more ridiculous than some of the other ones — it’s more outrageous than the normal abuse,” he said.

She was looking to shack up for life, but instead, she found herself in the big house for 3 days. An Ohio woman was arrested and sent to jail after calling 911 looking for a husband—five times. The dumbfounded dispatcher tried to clarify her request by asking Audrey Scott. [via Crime Case Files]

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