Capital Gate Named The World’s Furthest Leaning Tower

For a very long time, the Leaning Tower of Pisa has stood as the world’s most leaningest building. But Dubai has shown what people are capable of when they actually try to make a building lean. And now that honor goes to the Capital Gate building in Abu Dhabi, which was recently certified as being the “World’s Furthest Leaning Man-made Tower” by Guinness World Records.

The Capital Gate building has been deliberately engineered to slant. Photo: Capital Gate

For a very long time, the Leaning Tower of Pisa has stood as the world’s most leaningest building. But Dubai has shown what people are capable of when they actually try to make a building lean. And now that honor goes to the Capital Gate building in Abu Dhabi, which was recently certified as being the “World’s Furthest Leaning Man-made Tower” by Guinness World Records, according to reports.

The Capital Gate tower in Abu Dhabi tilts at 18 degrees using staggered flooring from the 12th floor of the 35-storey building. Photo: Capital Gate

Capital Gate leans at 18 degrees, which is about 5 times more than the Leaning Tower of Pisa, which leans at four degrees. The Leaning Tower of Pisa, of course, wasn’t meant to lean over the way that it does. However, the 35-story, 525-foot Capital Gate tower was built to lean 18 degrees westward. So, how did architects do it?

Capital Gate leans at 18 degrees, which is about 5 times more than the Leaning Tower of Pisa, which leans at four degrees. Photo: Capital Gate

According to Abu Dhabi National Exhibitions Company, who developed the tower, the building’s floor plates are stacked vertically until the 12th floor, after which point they are “staggered over each other by between 300mm to 1400mm.” ADNEC says Capital Gate also features “the world’s first known use of a ‘pre-cambered’ core, which contains more than 15,000 cubic meters of concrete reinforced with 10,000 tons of steel.”

According to Abu Dhabi National Exhibitions Company, who developed the tower, the building's floor plates are stacked vertically until the 12th floor, after which point they are "staggered over each other by between 300mm to 1400mm. Photo: Capital Gate

The building, which boasts on its website that it is “designed to provide no symmetry so it amazes inside and outside,” is being touted as an iconic tower for the Emirates’ capital, symbolizing the city’s vision of the future.

“Capital Gate is a landmark development for Abu Dhabi and with this recognition the tower takes its place among the world’s great buildings. It is a signature building which speaks of the foresight of the emirate,” ADNEC’s Chairman Sheikh Sultan Bin Tahnoon Al Nahyan said in a statement.

Where Italy's famous Tower of Pisa leans naturally, the Capital Gate structure was designed to tilt. Photo: Flickr

Unlike the tower in Pisa, the Capital Gate structure was specifically designed to lean and evaluators from Guinness World Records were invited to inspect the building when it was completed in January. When the interior of the building is finished later this year, Capital Gate will be home to a five-star hotel and office space.

Ali Saeed Bin Harmal Al Dhaheri, ADNEC’s managing director, said there had been numerous challenges along the way but that the company had ‘enjoyed the opportunity to create an iconic structure which is not only distinctive in appearance but also extremely functional’.

In January, Dubai – one of seven emirates that make up the UAE – unveiled the world’s tallest skyscraper: the $1.5 billion, 160-story Burj Khalifa, which has a height of more than 800 meters (2,625 ft). [Capital Gate via DP-News and CNN]

Share this article

We welcome comments that advance the story directly or with relevant tangential information. We try to block comments that use offensive language, all capital letters or appear to be spam, and we review comments frequently to ensure they meet our standards. If you see a comment that you believe is irrelevant or inappropriate, you can flag it to our editors by using the report abuse links. Views expressed in the comments do not represent those of Coinspeaker Ltd.