How Big is a Yottabyte?

Remember back in the 1980s when 100 MB was the size of a tire? Now we live in a world of gigabytes and terabytes, and the future will bring zettabytes and yottabytes in everyday life.

The world's first, two terabyte (2TB), 7200 RPM hard disk drive by Hitachi. Really small in Yottabyte-scale, isn't it?! Photo: Hitachi

Remember back in the 1980s when 100 MB was the size of a tire? Now we live in a world of gigabytes and terabytes, and the future will bring zettabytes and yottabytes in everyday life.

For those of you, who don’t know how big is a Yottabyte, the infograph below will definitely help you.

According to the wikipedia, a yottabyte is a unit of information or computer storage equal to one septillion (one long scale quadrillion or 1024) bytes (one quadrillion gigabytes). It is commonly abbreviated YB.

As of 2010, no system has yet achieved one yottabyte of storage. In fact, the combined space of all the computer hard drives in the entire world does not amount to even one yottabyte.

According to one study, all the world’s computers stored approximately 160 exabytes (see the wiki for more details) in 2006. As of 2009 the entire internet was estimated to contain close to 500 exabytes.

When used with byte multiples, the SI prefix indicates a power of 1,000: 1,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 bytes — 10008, or 1024. [via Digital Kamera and Wiki]

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