Google’s AdPlanner Stats: Facebook Leads in the Top 1,000 Sites

Facebook is the number 1 most-visited website on the web with 570 billion page views and 540 million unique visitors, according to Google’s AdPlanner stats.

Facebook is the number 1 most-visited website on the web, according to Google’s AdPlanner stats.

Facebook is the number 1 most-visited website on the web with 570 billion page views and 540 million unique visitors, according to Google’s AdPlanner stats. The largest social network outranks every other non-Google site, taking more than 35% of all web traffic measured.

It’s the first time Google publicly released a list of the top 1,000 sites by unique users as measured by Google’s Ad Planner. The list ranks sites based on category, unique visitors, reach and page views. Not only has Google come out with this list, but they are also allowing advertisers to specify that they only want their content ads to show on these top 1,000 sites.

The list will be updated monthly and does not include adult sites, ad networks, domains that don’t have publicly visible content or don’t load properly, and certain Google sites. Yes, Google removes some of their own sites. Google also tells which sites have advertising. Wikipedia and Mozilla.com are the only 2 sites in the top 10 that remain ad-free.

Destinations such as Mozilla.com, Yahoo.com, MSN.com and Live.com sit high in the rankings due in large part to their status as default landing pages for various browsers. Twitter, for example, ranks 18th with 5.4 billion page views, Flickr is 31st with 1.8 billion views and LinkedIn sits in 56th place at 1.7 billion views.

Other popular destinations, according to Google’s report, are international web portals such as Baidu, Sina, 163.com. Though relatively unheard of in American tech press, these sites are the online equivalent of our solar system’s Jupiter: enormous and a bit out of our reach.

Bank of America and PayPal also made the list, coming in at 93rd and 39th, respectively. And in the news category we find the BBC, which was ranked 43rd with 2.5 billion hits, followed by the New York Times, ranked 83rd with 600 million views.

Where does this data come from? Google explains it comes from “aggregated Google Toolbar data from users who have opted in to enhanced features, publisher opt-in anonymous Google Analytics data, opt-in external consumer panel data, and other third-party market research. The data is aggregated over millions of users and powered by computer algorithms.” [Google AdPlanner via Mashable and Search Engine Land]

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