2011 Volvo S60 Crashes During Demo of Its Auto Brake System

Maybe it’s the world’s worst PR – having something going completely wrong at a press event. And that’s exactly what happened to new 2011 Volvo S60 at the media presentation of the firm’s new car in Sweden this week.

The truck was placed. Cameras rolled. The S60 achieved its speed. It just forgot to stop. Photo: Nate Lanxon / Wired

Maybe it’s the world’s worst PR – having something going completely wrong at a press event. And that’s exactly what happened to new 2011 Volvo S60 at the media presentation of the firm’s new car in Sweden this week.

The expectations were simple. Hold a press conference to demonstrate how the “Collision Warning with Auto Brake” feature on the Swedish model of the Volvo S60 worked, send it towards a stationary truck at 35k/hr, and use the tremendous new technology to stop the car without human interaction.

Volvo said about the system: “Volvo’s new Collision Warning with Auto Brake automatically brakes the car if there is an imminent risk of a collision with a moving or stationary vehicle. The system starts by alerting the driver and preparing the braking system for emergency braking. If the driver does not respond despite the warning, the brakes are applied automatically.”

The truck was placed. Cameras rolled. The new 2011 Volvo S60 achieved its speed. It just forgot to stop. Check out the video below:

Amidst chuckles from the crowd, the Volvo MC could only say: “So ladies and gentlemen, we’ve had some kind of mishap in the testing here. I apologize for that. This car actually contains collision avoidance technology obviously not demonstrated in this crash.”

Some journalists were quick to point out that the system had worked earlier stopping the car before it hit the truck.

Volvo claimed that the pre-production test car “suffered as the result of a human error in preparation” and that the car’s battery was at fault, adding that “had a human been driving, he or she would have noticed the system was not operating correctly.” [via Carscoop and Wired (UK)]

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