Breathtaking Chinese Reed Flute Cave Photographs

The reed flute cave is the largest and most scenic of the karst caves in the Chinese tourist city of Guilin. Guilin is an ancient picturesque city, located in southern China. The Chinese themselves call Guilin, the most beautiful city in the Middle Kingdom.

The reed flute cave is the largest and most scenic of the karst caves in the Chinese tourist city of Guilin. Guilin is an ancient picturesque city, located in southern China. The Chinese themselves call Guilin, the most beautiful city in the Middle Kingdom.

Guilin is a tourist center, thanks to the wonderful nature. On the north-west, seven miles from the center of town is Mount Guanminshan, on the southern side of which sits a rock ‘reed flute. In this rock is unique cave, Called the Cave of reed flutes.

Reed Flute Cave is a zigzagging sea of stalactites and stalagmites in dazzling colors. Located in the northwest of Guilin, China, the Reed Flute Cave is one of the most extraordinary sceneries in Guilin, according to China Tour.

According to a legend, Reed Flute Cave got its name because people believed that the reed by the cave’s mouth could be made into flutes. Its name is explained by the fact that reeds for making flutes and pipes have been grown in this region since ancient times. This dripstone cave is 790 feet deep.

Offering a majestic fairyland of karst caves with landscape and rural scenery, there are large numbers of stalactites, stalagmites, stone pillars, stone curtains, and stone flowers, all glistening in colorful lights. Some of them were given names such as Pines in the Snow, Mushroom Hill, Dragon Pagoda, Sky-Scraping Twin, Virgin Forests, Red Curtain, etc.

One grotto is called The Crystal Palace of the Dragon King–an area that resembles a miniature Guilin. Thus, the cave is highly praised as the ‘Huge Art Palace of the Nature’. Tourists began to pay their visits here in the Tang Dynasty.

Over 70 wall inscriptions from the Tang Period (618-907) bear eloquent witness to the cave’s long history. At present, there are 77 stone inscriptions through the ages inside the cave since the opening of the cave in 1959. [via BigPicture and ChinaTour]

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