2011 Ford Mustang GT vs. 2010 BMW M3

BMW’s and Mustang’s fans, are you ready for the battle: 2011 Ford Mustang GT vs. 2010 BMW M3?! Even Sam Smith at Jalopnik has spied an interesting phenomenon in the car universe. The new 2011 Ford Mustang GT performance figures are within spitting distance of the mighty 2010 BMW M3.

BMW’s and Mustang’s fans, are you ready for the battle: 2011 Ford Mustang GT vs. 2010 BMW M3?! Even Sam Smith at Jalopnik has spied an interesting phenomenon in the car universe. The new 2011 Ford Mustang GT performance figures are within spitting distance of the mighty 2010 BMW M3, according to AutoBlog.

The new 2010 BMW M3 produces 414 horsepower out of its milky-smooth 4.0-liter V8 and hits the scales at 3,652 lbs. Meanwhile, the 5.0-liter Mustang serves up two less horsepower, but weighs 40 pounds less, too.

At this point, odds are your blood is pumping no matter which side of the ring you happen to find yourself on. Stats that close yield frighteningly similar numbers when the two cars hit the track, too.

The BMW M3 can clip off the 0-60 mph in 4.3 seconds. The Ford Mustang GT can do it in 4.4 seconds. Quarter mile? Deadlocked at 12.7 seconds at 111.3 mph. It’s true, a quarter mile doth not a sports car make, which is why these next figures are so important.

While the BMW M3 can come down from 60 mph in 105 feet, the Ford Mustang GT can do the same in 104 feet. And here’s an interesting fact: both cars hold onto the skidpad at 0.97 g.

Before the summary, it’s worth noting that the 2010 BWM M3 will set you back an eye-widening $28,180 more than the Mustang. The price tag for 2010 BWM M3 is $59.975 while for 2011 Ford Mustang GT is only $31.795), according to Jalopnik.

The summary: One is a luxury European sport sedan, the other a raw piece of traditional American muscle. 2011 Ford Mustang GT and 2010 BMW M3  are different cars with different purposes, but both awesome for entirely different reasons. As for us, we like Mustang. [via AutoBlog and Jalopnik]

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