2010 Winter Olympics Closing Ceremony

The 2010 Winter Olympics ended in spectacular triumph on Sunday with a breathtaking closing ceremony that mixed traditional pomp with self-deprecating humor to put the icing on 17 days of 2010 Winter Olympics Games.

The Olympic flame returned to B.C. Place on Sunday. It wasn't kept burning after the opening ceremony because the inflatable stadium roof is made of a special fabric. During the Games there was an outdoor flame that remained lit. Photo: Doug Mills/The New York Times

The 2010 Winter Olympics ended in spectacular triumph on Sunday with a breathtaking closing ceremony that mixed traditional pomp with self-deprecating humor to put the icing on 17 days of 2010 Winter Olympics Games.

The President of the International Olympic Committee Jacques Rogge declared that the 2010 Winter Olympics Games were “excellent and very friendly” in his closing speech that paid tribute to the Georgian luger who was killed in a training accident before the Games opened on February 12, 2010, according to Reuters’ report.

Vancouver youths helped kick off the closing ceremony on as they performed with snowboards around the Olympic caldron. Photo: Doug Mills/The New York Times

“We have shared the grief of an Olympic dream cut short. The memory of Nodar Kumaritashvili will always be with us,” the president of the International Olympics Committee, Jacques Rogge said before declaring the Games closed and inviting the world’s athletes to reassemble at Sochi, Russia for the 2014 Winter Olympics.

Members of the Russian team, promoting Sochi 2014, arriving at B.C. Place. Photo: Doug Mills/The New York Times

Millions of Canadians had already begun celebrating long before the ceremony began after a victory by the Canadian men’s hockey team over the United States 3-2 in the nerve-churning final competition of these Games.  Millions of fans were on the streets, where they celebrated the gold medal of nation men’s hockey team and the 2010 Winter Olympics that united the nation. In waves of their red and white hockey jerseys, they shouted “Go Canada!” to mark the country’s record 14th gold medal here.

Canada were already assured of finishing top of the standings for the first time at either a Winter or Summer Olympics but beating their American neighbors was the perfect ending for the hockey-crazy host nation.  “Our last one (gold) will be remembered for generations,” Vancouver’s organizing chief John Furlong said at the ceremony.

The Canadian victory set a new record for golds won by any nation at a single Winter Games, surpassing the previous mark of 13 jointly held by the Soviet Union (Innsbruck, 1976) and Norway (Salt Lake City, 2002).

The U.S. also set a record for the most overall medals won at a single Winter Olympics, finishing with 37, one more than Germany in 2002, but that was of little consolation to members of their beaten hockey team.

Members of the United States team, which earned 37 medals over all to lead the standings, during the parade of athletes. Photo: Doug Mills/The New York Times

Share this article

We welcome comments that advance the story directly or with relevant tangential information. We try to block comments that use offensive language, all capital letters or appear to be spam, and we review comments frequently to ensure they meet our standards. If you see a comment that you believe is irrelevant or inappropriate, you can flag it to our editors by using the report abuse links. Views expressed in the comments do not represent those of Coinspeaker Ltd.