British Researchers Say The G-spot Doesn’t Appear To Exist

Researchers from the King’s College of London searched for the so-called G-spot or area of sexual arousal in some 1,800 women but found it does not exist.

g-spot

Researchers from the King’s College of London searched for the so-called G-spot or area of sexual arousal in some 1,800 women but found it doesn’t exist.

The study published in the Journal of Sexual Medicine was disputed by sexologist Beverley Whipple, who popularized the term coined by German gynecologist Ernst Gräfenberg fifty years ago. The study asked the women if they had a G-spot and identical twins were involved as researchers assumed one with a G-spot meant the twin has a genetically similar area that causes powerful orgasms when stimulated.

Co-author of the study Professor Tim Spector concluded that the G-spot is subjective. Dr. Petra Boynton, a sexual psychologist at University College London, said those who don’t find their G-spot need not worry, as “everyone is different.”

The elusive erogenous zone said to exist in some women may be a myth, say researchers who have hunted for it. Their study in the Journal of Sexual Medicine is the biggest yet, involving 1,800 women, and it found no proof. The King’s College London team believe the G-spot may be a figment of women’s imagination, encouraged by magazines and sex therapists.

But sexologist Beverley Whipple, who helped popularise the G-spot idea, said the work was “flawed”. She said “The researchers had discounted the experiences of lesbian or bisexual women and failed to consider the effects of having different sexual partners with different love-making techniques. It’s irresponsible to claim the existence of an entity that has never been proven and pressurise women and men too.” [via BBC]

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