Fujian Tulou: China’s Amazing Hakka Houses

UNESCO dubbed China’s Hakka Houses as an official World Heritage Site in 2008, noting the historic & cultural values of these amazing structures.

chinese-hakka-houses_2

UNESCO dubbed China’s Hakka Houses as an official World Heritage Site in 2008, noting the historic & cultural values of these amazing structures. Constructed from the 12th century up through the 20th, these buildings housed up to 800 people each, a city within a city that provided it’s inhabitants with safety, shelter and community. Also known as Fujian Tulou, there are 20,000 of these structures across the Fujian province of China. The Fujian Tolou are an important part of this province’s history, as these buildings were designed to protect their inhabitants from roaming bandits and warlords.

The typical tulou is a three to five story structure comprised of a thick earthen wall with a single entrance that was protected by a 4″ thick solid wooden door and an iron gate. Hakka Houses capture the spirit of rural China. Their occupants share a sense of community and hard work for the greater good, where the tasks of daily life are managed collectively, not alone. These structures are decidedly Chinese in nature, with clay tiled roofs, wooden framing, stone walkways and earthen walls. [GlobalPost via Notcot]

Share this article

We welcome comments that advance the story directly or with relevant tangential information. We try to block comments that use offensive language, all capital letters or appear to be spam, and we review comments frequently to ensure they meet our standards. If you see a comment that you believe is irrelevant or inappropriate, you can flag it to our editors by using the report abuse links. Views expressed in the comments do not represent those of Coinspeaker Ltd.